Autoline finds the system to be distracting, nerve-wracking, and prone to get lost.

A nervous student driver? That's how Autoline describes Tesla's Autopilot functionality after testing it out on two separate occasions in a Model 3.

Sure, the system isn't perfect but can it really be as bad as Autoline claims? Do you recall being a student driver? If so, then you can relate to the difficulty involved with learning how to drive. It's certainly no easy task and even long-time drivers aren't without fault.

However, what Autoline is trying to say is really that Autopilot is a system that requires a watchdog (the driver) and that's exactly what a Level 2 autonomous driving system is. This is not full self-driving, nor should it be considered even close to such. Autoline states:

"...we still found the system to be distracting, nerve-wracking, and prone to get lost."

A rather vague blanket statement, yet Autoline goes on to praise the system as a "technical achievement" that's "not ready for primetime." Again though, the point is missed. Autopilot is a driver aid, not a replacement for a driver at this point in time.

Watch the clip above to see Autoline's take on Tesla Autopilot. Stay tuned as InsideEVs has an upcoming rebuttal piece to this Autoline video coming soon.

Video description via Autoline on YouTube:

We recently did a test drive video of Tesla’s Autopilot and were vilified by Tesla fan boys who said we didn’t know what we were doing. Fair enough, we didn’t.

So we read up on it, practiced, and did the test all over again.  But we still found the system to be distracting, nerve-wracking, and prone to get lost.

Autopilot represents a technical achievement, but it’s still not ready for prime time.