But has no new regulations set in place just yet.

New regulations are set to be announced either late this month, next month or maybe even as far off as June. It seems the Pruitt-led EPA is not yet ready to lock down a date, month or perhaps even year yet, though it's certain the current regulations put in place by Obama are "not appropriate."

***UPDATE: As we predicted, CARB has issued a release in response to the EPA. Release further below.

Those "not appropriate" regulations include: boosting fuel economy to a fleet average of more than 50 miles per gallon by 2025, or approximately 36 mpg in real-world driving.

Related - EPA Combatant, Scott Pruitt, Confirmed To Head The Organization

Now, before we expose some of the recently revealed details, let us go on record stating that any actions taken by Pruitt may be short-lived. Pruitt, along with President Trump, could potentially have a limited time in office. Changes such as this can generally be seen as temporary. With that being said, we expect a reversal of any Pruitt-announced changes to come under a future administration. In addition, automakers, both here and on the global scale, have far too much invested to backtrack now.

Read Also - Automakers Ask New EPA Chief Pruitt To Withdraw 2025 Emissions Targets

UPDATE: Pruitt-Led EPA Announces End Of Obama-Era Emissions Regulations

Moving on...

Here's what Pruitt stated just moments ago:

“The Obama Administration's determination was wrong. Obama’s EPA cut the Midterm Evaluation process short with politically charged expediency, made assumptions about the standards that didn’t comport with reality, and set the standards too high.”

Of course, the full-on assault wouldn't be complete without going after California's own regulations too. From the release:

Under the Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA sets national standards for vehicle tailpipe emissions of certain pollutants. Through a CAA waiver granted by EPA, California can impose stricter standards for vehicle emissions of certain pollutants than federal requirements. The California waiver is still being reexamined by EPA under Administrator Pruitt’s leadership. 

“Cooperative federalism doesn’t mean that one state can dictate standards for the rest of the country. EPA will set a national standard for greenhouse gas emissions that allows auto manufacturers to make cars that people both want and can afford — while still expanding environmental and safety benefits of newer cars. It is in America's best interest to have a national standard, and we look forward to partnering with all states, including California, as we work to finalize that standard,” said Administrator Pruitt.

You'd better believe that California Air Resources Board Chair Mary Nichols will launch a massive offensive against any action that may seek reverse the state's clean air standards.

This process will be tedious and ongoing for a long, long time. Don't expect to see any immediate changes.

CARB response below:

CARB Chair Issues Response to EPA press release on weakening vehicle standards

California Air Resources Board Chair Mary D. Nichols issued the following statement in response to the press release issued by EPA about weakening the standards for cars and light trucks, model years 2022-2025.

“This is a politically motivated effort to weaken clean vehicle standards with no documentation, evidence or law to back up that decision. This is not a technical assessment, it is a move to demolish the nation’s clean car program. EPA’s action, if implemented, will worsen people’s health with degraded air quality and undermine regulatory certainty for automakers.

This decision takes the U.S. auto industry backward, and we will vigorously defend the existing clean vehicle standards and fight to preserve one national clean vehicle program.

Meanwhile, today’s decision changes nothing in California and the 12 other states with clean car rules that reduce emissions and improve gas mileage—those rules remain in place. California will not weaken its nationally accepted clean car standards, and automakers will continue to meet those higher standards, bringing better gas mileage and less pollution for everyone.”

CARB Chair, Mary D. Nichols

CARB's mission is to promote and protect public health, welfare, and ecological resources through effective reduction of air pollutants while recognizing and considering effects on the economy. The CARB oversees all air pollution control efforts in California to attain and maintain health based air quality standards.

Press blast from the EPA below:

EPA Administrator Pruitt: GHG Emissions Standards for Cars and Light Trucks Should Be Revised

04/02/2018

WASHINGTON (April 2, 2018) — Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt is announcing the completion of the Midterm Evaluation (MTE) process for the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for cars and light trucks for model years 2022-2025, and his final determination that, in light of recent data, the current standards are not appropriate and should be revised. Administrator Pruitt is also announcing the start of a joint process with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to develop a notice and comment rulemaking to set more appropriate GHG emissions standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. 

“The Obama Administration's determination was wrong,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “Obama’s EPA cut the Midterm Evaluation process short with politically charged expediency, made assumptions about the standards that didn’t comport with reality, and set the standards too high.”

Under the Clean Air Act (CAA), EPA sets national standards for vehicle tailpipe emissions of certain pollutants. Through a CAA waiver granted by EPA, California can impose stricter standards for vehicle emissions of certain pollutants than federal requirements. The California waiver is still being reexamined by EPA under Administrator Pruitt’s leadership. 

“Cooperative federalism doesn’t mean that one state can dictate standards for the rest of the country. EPA will set a national standard for greenhouse gas emissions that allows auto manufacturers to make cars that people both want and can afford — while still expanding environmental and safety benefits of newer cars. It is in America's best interest to have a national standard, and we look forward to partnering with all states, including California, as we work to finalize that standard,” said Administrator Pruitt.

Additional Background

As part of the 2012 rulemaking establishing the model year 2017-2025 light-duty vehicle GHG standards, EPA made a regulatory commitment to conduct a MTE of the standards for MY 2022-2025 no later than April 1, 2018. This evaluation would determine whether the standards remain appropriate or should be made more, or less stringent.  

In November 2016, the Obama Administration short-circuited the MTE process and rushed out their final determination on January 12, 2017, just days before leaving office. Since then, the auto industry and other stakeholders sought a reinstatement of the original MTE timeline, so that the Agency could review the latest information. 

EPA and the U.S. Department of Transportation announced a reestablishment of the MTE process in March 2017. And, in August 2017, EPA reopened the regulatory docket and asked for additional information and data relevant to assessing whether the GHG emissions standards remain appropriate, including information on: consumer behavior, feedback on modeling approaches, and assessing advanced fuels technologies. EPA also held a public hearing on this topic.