Starting this April, plug-in hybrids will no longer be able to use public charging stations in Beverly Hills, California.

Instead, those charging sites will be open only to pure electric cars. Here's the wording from the release:

"In order to improve access for vehicles that are 100% reliant on electric power, the new policy reserves the City’s EV charging stations for battery-only electric vehicles. All other vehicles (including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) and any vehicle without an active charging session or not connected to a station may be subject to citation and/or towing at the owner’s expense."

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In some ways this makes sense to us, in others it doesn't.

Certain areas of California are overwhelmed by plug-in vehicles, which means that there aren't yet enough charging stations for all, so to favor a pure electric car seems right in these instances.

However, plug-in hybrid buyers largely bought these vehicles on the grounds that they'd be able to charge them as needed to reduce gasoline miles as much as possible.

This new regulation in Beverly Hills is sure to be of high debate. The easiest solution we see is to install more charging stations and possibly to increase charging fees.

We've included the press blast below for additional details:

City’s New Electric Vehicle Charging Policy Takes Effect

Updated policy encourages more efficient use of City’s 35 EV charging stations

Beverly Hills, CA – As more electric vehicles enter the market and our roadways, the City of Beverly Hills has established a new Electric Vehicle (EV) charging policy to prepare the City’s EV charging infrastructure to meet the increasing demand.

The new policy, effective April 2, 2018, encourages more availability and efficient use of the City’s 35 publicly available EV charging stations. Currently, 59 Level 2 connections are available in 14 City parking facilities and at Roxbury Park.

Key components of the EV Charging Policy include:  implementing energy and station fees, in addition to facility parking fees  prohibiting plug-in hybrid electric vehicles from charging  implementing new enforcement regulation inherent in signage

The new rate structure establishes an Energy Fee of $0.25/kilowatt-hour (kWh)—applicableonly when the vehicle is actively charging—to recover the cost of providing electricity, as well as a Station Fee of $6/hour—applicable after the first two hours of establishing a connection, regardless of whether the vehicle is charging—to encourage turnover to make the station available for other users.

In order to improve access for vehicles that are 100% reliant on electric power, the new policy reserves the City’s EV charging stations for battery-only electric vehicles. All other vehicles (including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles) and any vehicle without an active charging session or not connected to a station may be subject to citation and/or towing at the owner’s expense.

Drivers should consult EV charging station signage for details about fees, rates and restrictions.

The City Council received a presentation of the proposed EV Charging Policy, based on recommendations from the Traffic and Parking Commission, at the July 5, 2016 study

session.