This Tesla Model X lost a ton of range sitting in a parking garage for six days.

Yes folks, when Bjørn Nyland parked the Model X, it had 284 km (176 miles) of range. He was traveling to attend the Tesla Semi reveal event, among other related business. After leaving it for just over six days, Nyland returned to the vehicle to find that the range had dropped to 187 km (116 miles). This is an average of about 15 km (9.3 miles) per day, which equates to 3.1 kWh each day.

Tesla Model X vampire drain

Tesla Model X vampire drain

Nyland did admit that he did not have the car in energy savings mode, and he kept waking it up, checking the mobile app, etc. If the car is in "sleep mode" it will lose less energy, but remember, although the vehicle goes to "sleep", it's never completely off.

Lithium-ion batteries discharge even when not in use. However, even if the batteries are installed into a device, the average loss is about 1 percent per day, though it can be much higher. We've all seen our smartphone batteries die just a bit even when we're not using the device or it's completely powered off.

Nyland recommends planning ahead by factoring in your future travel distance (to the airport, etc.) and accounting for the worst case scenario in regards to vampire drain. This way, you won't end up in a bad situation. Also, obviously if you can keep the car plugged in, that's the best solution.

Video Description via Bjørn Nyland on YouTube:

Model X parked for a little over 6 days. Energy saving off, always connected. It consumed 15 km/day (3.1 kWh/day).

Check out an older video below. Nyland shows vampire drain in his Model S as a best-case scenario since the above Model X didn't fare so well. In the video below, Nyland was on vacation for 27 days during the winter and lost less than 20 percent (or less than 1 percent per day), which is expected and actually really good.

What's your experience with vampire drain?

Keep the conversation going in our Forum. Start a new thread about this article and make your point heard.