Toyota announced three areas of electrification for China in the upcoming future from Auto Guangzhou 2017, specifically plug-in hybrids, all-electric ... and of course, hydrogen fuel cells.

Toyota Mirai at TMEC Hydrogen Station in Changshu High Tech Industrial Park, Changshu, Jiangsu Province, China

Toyota Mirai at TMEC Hydrogen Station in Changshu High Tech Industrial Park, Changshu, Jiangsu Province, China

The Japanese manufacturer already offers conventional, domestically produced hybrids - the Corolla Hybrid and Levin Hybrid.  In 2017, roughly 100,000 units of these will be sold in China.

However, both, the Corolla and Levin will get plug-in hybrid versions in the near future.

In 2020 Toyota will introduce, under its own brand, its first all-electric model for China.

Senior Managing Officer and CEO of the China Region, Hiroji Onishi said:

"We will use the technology we have nurtured in hybrid electrification to carry out extensive development of new energy vehicles as required by China."

The third part of Toyota's plan for a green future is FCVs ... but still in a more theoretical way. Toyota now plans its current fuel-cell vehicle feasibility study to be expanded to cover commercial vehicles such as buses.

Toyota just opened its first hydrogen station in China.

"Recently, the TMEC*2 Hydrogen Station has been completed for fuel cell vehicles, and verification is being carried out under a three-year plan from October using two Mirai vehicles.

Toyota will also study and evaluate the feasibility of using commercial vehicles, such as buses, in China to explore the potential usage of fuel cell technology. Fuel cell buses have already been introduced in Japan and a feasibility study on potential usage of fuel cell technology in heavy-duty trucks in the U.S. are ongoing. Toyota is also proceeding with demonstration tests of fuel-cell vehicles with Mirai in countries such as Australia, the U.A.E., and Canada. Ultimately, Toyota aims to achieve a hydrogen-based society through verification under a range of environments."