The Tesla Model 3 in its dual-motor, all-wheel-drive configuration is set to arrive in the spring of 2018 (Image Credit: <a href=Gary C at TMC forum)" draggable="false">

The Tesla Model 3 in its dual-motor, all-wheel-drive configuration is set to arrive in the spring of 2018 (Image Credit: Gary C at TMC forum)

The dual-motor, all-wheel drive Tesla Model 3 is now forthcoming, and potentially sooner than expected.

As we previously reported, Tesla just updated its online Model 3 configurator to include the base model and dual motor model, along with specified arrival expectations. The base model (single-motor, ~50 kWh battery pack) is set to arrive in early 2018, which is now - or soon. The all-wheel-drive sedan shows an arrival estimate of Spring '18.

Inside the Tesla Model 3, LA Auto Show (Image Credit: Tom M/InsideEVs)

Inside the Tesla Model 3, LA Auto Show (Image Credit: Tom M/InsideEVs)

Obviously, these are estimates, and thus far, Tesla has followed suit with its usual adjustment of timelines. The automaker pushed estimates back three months and then six months, essentially. This was all following early production issues, which may or may not be resolved at this point.

However, the automaker upped production in December to deliver over 1,000 Model 3s and reported that it was able to produce about that many cars per week at some point prior to the end of 2017. None of this guarantees that there won't be additional "bottlenecks" along the way, especially as these new variants begin production.

With the information gleaned from the new configurator, one might assume that the base model would be the next vehicle we might hear about actual production or registered VINs, since it's supposed to arrive ahead of the dual-motor Model 3. However, a recent report on Reddit proves otherwise.

Tesla is currently registering VINs above 8,000 with the NHTSA, and as of this writing, 19 of these cars are dual-motor, all-wheel-drive vehicles. It's important to keep in mind that although VIN tracking and decoding can provide us some interesting speculation, it's never considered to be consistent or accurate.

Source: Reddit, Electrek