Porsche Mission E Concept

Porsche Mission E Concept

If pricing proves true, we may have the first reasonable Tesla Model S competitor yet, aside from the Porsche's lack of adult-sized rear seats.

As we previously reported, Porsche is surely moving forward with making its Mission E concept a reality, and apparently, it's very much like the version we saw in Frankfurt in 2015 ... or not?

Porsche CEO, Oliver Blume, shared on one recent occasion:

Inside the Mission E concept

Inside the Mission E concept

“It is very close to what you saw two years ago at Frankfurt."

Although he also told CAR Magazine:

“It will be exciting but a bit different from the concept."

We won't know for sure what those comments mean until we get a look at the production version, which is slated for the 2020 model year. Unfortunately, we have to wait until 2019 for those pictures. Perhaps Porsche will rethink the tight rear seats of the car if they really intend to make this a Model S competitor. Wait ... that would be a Panamera then, right? Anyhow, we do have some details surrounding the production vehicle and now a potential price.

The Mission E will come with a 350 kW charge rate and should allow for an 80-percent charge in as little as 15 minutes. This is 400 km (~250 miles) in a car that is supposed to tout a 300-mile range. Porsche aims for a 3.5 second zero-to-60 mph time and a top speed of 155 mph. Blume calls the new model a car to fill the void between the 911 and the Panamera, and he says it will be:

“priced like entry-level Panamera.”

For comparison, the base 911 Carrera will set you back $91,100, whereas the entry-level Panamera starts at $85,000.

Like all Porsche models, there will be at least two different main configurations, like an S and a GTS. Each will surely have different range and specs. So the above info referring to acceleration, top speed, and range may be linked to the more performance-oriented model, while the price is for the base? Although, it could be set up like a Tesla Model S 100D versus P100D situation. In this case, one car would perform better (following the above stats) and cost more, but the other would have the greater range and be priced lower. There's also the solid potential for dual-motor all-wheel drive versus single-motor two-wheel drive. Sources say that Porsche is also still working on different body styles.

The least expensive Model S 75 is $69,500 (249 miles, 0-60 in 4.3s, 140mph top speed). The 75D (AWD) is $74,500 (259 miles, 0-60 in 4.2s, 140 mph). The 100D boasts 335 miles, 4.1 seconds, and 155 mph, but it will cost you a whopping $94,000. The $135,000 top-of-the-line P100D loses 20 miles of range, but it can undercut 2.5 seconds on a 0-60 sprint.

If Porsche is looking at $85,000 for a base model without the above-stated range and performance, then Tesla has the automaker beat by $15,500. However, if those stats are congruent with pricing for a car set to compete with the upper-level Tesla Model S vehicles, then Porsche may be on to something. It's a waiting game at this point.

Porsche Mission E

Porsche Mission E

Porsche Mission E Interior

Porsche Mission E Interior

Porsche Mission E

Porsche Mission E

Source: The Truth About Cars