Following some kickback from Tesla owners, the automaker has decided to eliminate the "Software performance reductions due to frequent max power" that had previously been in place for the Model S and Model X.

Tesla says that rather than limiting power, it will monitor the condition of the vehicle's powertrain and push out an alert if service is required. Here's the statement from Tesla on the matter:

“Software performance reductions due to frequent max power usage have been removed. These reductions had been in place to proactively protect the powertrain from wear and tear. Instead, we will monitor the condition of the powertrain and display an alert if service is needed so we can take proactive steps, such as by replacing parts if necessary, to maintain the vehicle’s performance.”

Initially, the restrictions were discovered via a Tesla Motors Club Forum discussion in which a Tesla representative responded to an inquiry like this (see orginal TMC thread here):

“Thank you for your time. To recap our conversation, using launch mode places an increased stress on the entire powertrain accelerating aging and fatigue of various components. The computer systems automatically track launch mode usage and continually estimate fatigue damage. Depending on how launch mode is used, the computer may eventually limit the available power during launch mode to protect the powertrain. Note that this is a common strategy also employed in other high performance cars. As discussed, upgrading to the P100D ludicrous will remove this limit and will not be limited in the future as the P100D does not have this limit for launch mode.”

After some initial outcry from Tesla owners, Jon McNeill, Tesla's head of global sales and service, reached out to the Tesla owners community by stating:

“Based on your input, we have decided to remove all software performance reductions tied to frequent max power usage. These changes will roll out with our next software update (in about three weeks).

We had put these reductions in place to proactively protect the powertrain from wear and tear. Instead, we will monitor the condition of the powertrain and let our customers know if service is needed so that we can take proactive steps, such as by replacing parts if necessary, to maintain the vehicle’s performance.”

It took approximately 2 months, not 3 weeks, to roll out the change, but it's here now in the latest software update. So, software performance reductions are now a thing of the past in Teslas.