Motor Trend Results - Image <a href=Via Motor Trend" draggable="false">

Motor Trend Results - Image Via Motor Trend

A new day...a new Tesla Model S P100D with Ludicrous + record.

Motor Trend just released results from its recent Model S P100D testing. The beast of a machine set a whole slew of Motor Trend records. From Motor Trend:

"We all understand acceleration. It’s the rate of change of velocity. This 4,891-pound Tesla Model S P100D does it best, reaching 30, 40, 50, and 60 mph from a standstill more quickly than any other production vehicle we’ve ever tested, full stop. In our testing, no production car has ever cracked 2.3 seconds from 0 to 60 mph. But Tesla has, in 2.275507139 seconds."

The previous 0 to 60 MPH record for the Model S P100D with Ludicrous + stood at 2.38 seconds set a few weeks ago. We should note that Motor Trend's time is not an officially documented record, but neither was the previous 2.38-second run by Tesla racing Channel.

Moving on to the quarter-mile, Motor Trends recorded a 10.5-second time at 125 MPH. Again, not an officially documented record, but if it was, it would beat out the current, official record of 10.72 seconds at 120.27 miles per hour.

Motor Trend explains the sheer accelerative force of the Model S P100D with Ludicrous + as such:

"Launching a Model S P100D (weighing 5,062 with gear and driver) in full-on Ludicrous Easter-egg mode snaps your body in a manner that is utterly impossible to replicate in any other street-legal production car on normal tires and dry asphalt at a mid-$100,000 price point. We regard 0–30-mph acceleration times as the benchmark for how hard a car launches, and this new Tesla gets there 0.05 second ahead of the next quickest (aforementioned) 0.92-second 911 Turbo S."

Imagine if the Model S P100D went on a weight reduction plan. Tesla CEO Elon Musk says a stripped down S could possibly dash from 0 to 60 MPH in just ~2.1 seconds and that's right around the time posted by the Electric GT Tesla racing series, which just so happens to run stripped-down Model S P100Ds.

Source: Motor Trend