During the late January ride-and-drive event in California for the Chevrolet Bolt, the electric car's chief engineer, Mike Lelli, discussed General Motor's "regular car" approach to the Bolt.

The Chevrolet Bolt EV sold almost 1,200 copies in its first full month of availability in January

The Chevrolet Bolt EV sold almost 1,200 copies in its first full month of availability in January

According to Lelli, the Bolt is targeted at the masses and, as such, it can't be quirky. Quoting Lelli:

"If you're going to go to the masses, it can't be this quirky thing. There are lots of people who like the car not because it's zero-emissions but because of the way it drives."

Quirkiness is often associated with hybrids and plug-in vehicles and it's definitely not a plus if you're targeting the wider audience.

Even Stuart Norris, the Bolt's design director, chimed in on the "regular car" versus quirky, stating:

"There was an emphasis in making the car special rather than stand out as weird. We need it to work for more than just the die-hard EV fans."

There again is the "for-the-masses" statement too.

Chevy's marketing team is even working to incorporate the Bolt into its "Real People, Not Actors" commercials. The Bolt won't be the focus of these commercials, but it will appear, according to GM.

Lastly, Steve Majoros, Chevy's marketing director for cars and crossovers, added this comment, which pretty much sums up the "for-the-masses" approach GM is taking with the Bolt:

"It wasn't, "Let's take a Sonic and strap a battery pack on it."

 "And it's not a single-occupant, Monday-through-Friday car. It's got to meet expectations for a car in general."

Source: Automotive News