Questions 10A and 10B : Willingness to consider purchasing PHEVs and EVs

Questions 10A and 10B : Willingness to consider purchasing PHEVs and EVs

An interesting study entitled "Consumer Views on Plug-in Electric Vehicles – National Benchmark Report" was released by Mark Singer of late (National Renewable Energy Laboratory).

Data was captured in February 2015 from a 1,015-household sample, designed to be representative of the United States population.

If NREL study is right, then we should get a decent image of the market heading into this year.

The most important question was about whether respondents would consider or expect to purchase plug-in. The answer was yes for:

  • PHEV: 24%
  • BEV: 20%
Given that the U.S. plug-ins market share is currently below 1%, it is a positive sign that sales should go up as the plug-in product offerings both deepen and improve.

As to why consumers are interested in plug-ins, and why they are not:

Question 11: Reasons for considering PEVs

Question 11: Reasons for considering PEVs

Question 12: Reasons for not considering PEVs

Question 12: Reasons for not considering PEVs

Majority of 56% respondents said that they expect 300 miles range form electric cars:

Question 14: Required EV range for purchase consideration

Question 14: Required EV range for purchase consideration

2016 Chevrolet Volt Sales Easily Surpass A Year Ago

2016 Chevrolet Volt Sales Easily Surpass A Year Ago

Here is the study summary, while below you can find link to the full report.

Consumer Views Quick Facts

The following findings are based on a February 2015 study that covered consumer attitudes toward plug-in electric vehicles. The study covered a 1,015-household sample designed to be representative of the United States population.

Vehicle Purchasing Behaviors

• 60% of respondent households owned two or more vehicles. • 53% of respondents stated their last vehicle purchases were sedans. • 48% of respondents stated their next vehicle purchases would likely be sedans. • 29% of respondent households had purchased vehicles in the last year.

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Awareness

• 48% of respondents were able to name a specific plug-in electric vehicle make and model. • 49% of respondents reported having seen plug-in electric vehicles in parking lots. • 52% of respondents stated plug-in hybrid electric vehicles were just as good as or better than traditional gasoline vehicles. • 45% of respondents stated pure electric vehicles were just as good as or better than traditional gasoline vehicles. • 24% of respondents stated they would consider or expect to purchase plug-in hybrid electric vehicles for their next vehicle purchase or lease. • 20% of respondents stated they would consider or expect to purchase pure electric vehicles for their next vehicle purchase or lease.

Barriers to Plug-in Electric Vehicle Acceptance

• A pure electric vehicle would need to be able to travel 300 miles on a single charge for 56% of respondents to be willing to consider purchasing one. • 18% of respondents were aware of charging stations on the routes they regularly drove. • 53% of respondents could consistently park their vehicles near electrical outlets at home. • 51% of respondents would be willing to pay incremental costs for plug-in electric vehicles.

Tesla Model S Sales Improved 48% in Q4

Tesla Model S Sales Improved 48% in Q4

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Acceptance

• Respondents who were aware of plug-in electric vehicle charging stations were more likely than respondents overall to view plug-in electric vehicles positively and be willing to consider purchasing them. • Respondents who were able to name one of the top nine best-selling plug-in electric vehicles were more likely than respondents overall to view plug-in electric vehicles positively and be willing to consider purchasing them. • New vehicle purchasers were more likely than used vehicle purchasers to view plug-in electric vehicles positively and be willing to consider purchasing them.

Acknowledgments

This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Office. Additional support came from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, which is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

source: Consumer Views on Plug-in Electric Vehicles – National Benchmark Report, Mark Singer (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)