According to the DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, the electricity generation of today emits about 30% less CO2 emissions than 40 years ago.

Which doesn't sound like a lot, until of course once notices that most of the improvement is via the last 10 years, thanks to the growing role of renewable energy soruces - which as of 2015 is now the #1 source of new energy generation in the world.

2017 smart electric drive cabrio drives by a...flipping wind turbine of course (little known fact:<em> OEM pictures of EVs without wind turbines were banned several years ago</em>)

2017 smart electric drive cabrio drives by a...flipping wind turbine of course (little known fact: OEM pictures of EVs without wind turbines were banned several years ago)

The decent pace of lowering CO2 emissions, and hopefully other emissions, is just further wind in the sails of today's EV revolution.

"In 1973, the electric power sector produced 691 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per million kilowatt hour (kW-hr) of electricity generated.

By 2015, CO2 emissions were down to 488 metric tons per million kW-hr of electricity generated. That reduction is about 30% with much of it occurring in the last ten years. The declining use of coal and increasing reliance on less carbon intensive sources, including natural gas and renewables, has contributed to the decrease in CO2 emissions from electricity generation.

Since February of 2016, the transportation sector CO2 emissions have exceeded that of the electric power sector, partly due to the decrease in electric power sector emissions. As the transportation sector relies more upon the power grid for supporting the growing number of plug-in electric vehicles, the decrease in CO2 from power generation will benefit the transportation sector as well."

source: energy.gov