Tesla Supercharger network from PlugShare

Tesla Supercharger network from PlugShare

Recently, Christian Ruoff of Charged EV Magazine posted DC Fast Charging Maps Highlight the differences between Tesla and ChAdeMO/DCC rollouts.  Christian is using Maps generated from PlugShare's quaterly infrastructre reports posted here.

Through Q3 2015, Tesla Motors had crossed the 200-mark of US supercharger locations, with over 1,250 charging outlets. (232 as of this post)  In comparison, the US CHAdeMO DC fast charging outlets had also crossed the 1,250 mark and the the US CCS DC fast chargers were slowly growing to 470 outlets. There is one glaring difference, the CHAdeMO locations were 939 and the CCS locations were 270. The three PlugShare plots tell the tale.

CHAdeMO Fast Charging Locations from PlugShare

CHAdeMO Fast Charging Locations from PlugShare

CCS DC Fast Charging Locations from PlugShare

CCS DC Fast Charging Locations from PlugShare

From the onset, Tesla Motors set out to build cross-country corridors running north-to-south and east-to-west. The CHAdeMO and CCS DC fast chargers have provided a totally different cluster strategy to support the existing 80-mile BEV market primarily serving the city EV. This will most likely remain this way until the 200-mile BEVs start to arrive.

The Debut Of The Chevrolet Bolt Is Putting Pressure On Other OEMs To Not Get Left Behind

The Debut Of The Chevrolet Bolt Is Putting Pressure On Other OEMs To Not Get Left Behind

Well, get ready for all three charging maps to change. GM has the Chevy Bolt on the production schedule for 2016 Q4. The Chevy Bolt will certainly be the first of many economic 200-mile BEVs to hit production with little more than a year before they start to arrive. With this EV, drivers will begin looking for interstate EVSE corridors to open. Likewise, if Tesla Motors is successful at selling 100,000 Model III annually, they are only a couple of years from needing increased fast charging options. As of this post, California has 36 Tesla Motors Supercharger stations open, 3 under construction, and six more permitted.

The needs for all three standards will be challenged within a two to five year window.  Increased EV traffic will not only require more fast charger locations to connect the corridors, they will most likely require stations with more outlets. Currently, Tesla Superchargers typically are outfitted with six outlets, while CHAdeMO and CCS DC fast chargers typically have one or two outlets.

Someday We'll See Gen 3 Tesla Parked Next to the Model S and Model X at Supercharger Stations

Someday We'll See Gen 3 Tesla Parked Next to the Model S and Model X at Supercharger Stations

The next few years promise to be exciting in the growth of EVs. With that growth will come the growing pains of the charging infrastructure.  Even as the EV fleet remains as a few percent of the autos on the highway, the image of 100,000 weekend vacation commuters could produce tens if not hundreds of EVs encountering one dual fast charger, and that is horrifying. Likewise, 50,000+ Tesla models accumulating each year in the California market will require a little more charger clustering as well.

With three standards, adapters will be necessary for the immediate future. CCS configured EVs like the Bolt would benefit from a CHAdeMO adapter, and the reverse for CHAdeMO configured EVs will be true as more CCS locations grow. Tesla Motors currently offer a CHAdeMO adapter as an option. The CCS most likely will follow.

This is a problem we have been looking forward to for some time, too many EVs on the highways! How many DCFCs will be needed per 1000 PEVs now that they will serve more than a metro area only? What will future maps of fast charging locations look like and how many outlets will be required? Tesla Motors has provided an insight through 2016.

Give us your thoughts.