Sales of electric cars in Germany aren't great.  In fact, they are outright depressing...and that is even counting the bogus plug-in sales being registered in the country late in 2015 in an effort to skirt EU emission regulations before being re-sold elsewhere.

Plug-in electric car registrations in Germany Through 2015.  <em>Assisted In The Last 3 Months By A Sudden ~2,400 Phantom (we assume) Kia Soul EV Registrations</em>

Plug-in electric car registrations in Germany Through 2015.  Assisted In The Last 3 Months By A Sudden ~2,400 Phantom (we assume) Kia Soul EV Registrations

At one point, the country had a goal of having 1 million EVs on the road by 2020 (and we suppose it still does officially).

As it stands at the end of 2015, only about 50,000 plug-ins have been sold (~24,000 in 2015), a quarter of the planned amount by this point in time.

In an effort to change its EV fortunes, the government in Germany has long threatened to bring in incentives in the past, but up until now, nothing of significance has materialized.   That may change soon enough.

On Friday, a senior ally of German Chancellor Angela Merkel said that politicians and auto executives will now sit down with the Chancellor directly and discuss incentives of up to 5,000 euros ($5,400 USD) on new plug-in purchases to kick-start the segment.

"The heads of the three parties in Merkel's ruling coalition have weighed introducing a subsidy for electric car buyers, said Horst Seehofer, head of the Christian Social Union (CSU), sister party of Merkel's Christian Democratic Union (CDU)." reported Reuters Friday.

Past The Rather Suspect 3,839 Kia Soul EV Registrations In Germany, The BMW i3 Finished

Past The Rather Suspect 3,839 Kia Soul EV Registrations In Germany, The BMW i3 Finished "Second" With 2,271 Sales

As always, the German government is there to once again throw a potential wrench the program, as Mr. Seehofer says that Germany is "looking into" having the car company's themselves co-finance the new incentives.  Those kickbacks will be one of the central issues Chancellor Merkel will discuss with auto execs next week. "Viel Glück" with that one.

No figures on how much the automakers might be asked to contribute, but Der Spiegel (German weekly magazine) suggested a figure of 1,500 to 2,000 euros per incentive is being tossed around.

When asked for comment, a Economy Ministry spokeswoman said Friday on the potential for incentives.

"Talks within the German government are constructive. We are counting on arriving at a good solution to help achieve our goals"

So, will this time, be the time Germany gets serious about EV incentives?  Or will the can get kicked down the road once again?

Yahoo! Hat tip to Dag J!