Tesla Motors Gallery in NorthPark, Dallas

Tesla Motors Gallery in NorthPark, Dallas

While exploring the market outlook in the U.S., we are taking this opportunity to look at the difference between all-electric and non-all-electric plug-ins.

Using data collected by the Electric Drive Transportation Association, which breaks down BEVs and PHEVs (incl. EREV), we found out that the advantage for BEVs is increasing.

Note: Data from EDTA typically slightly differs compared to InsideEVs due to the estimations involved with Tesla sales, but the numbers are very close overall.

All-electric car sales (despite Nissan LEAF plunging) increased in most months this year (6,704 and +12% in September), which translated to 51,267 sales in nine months (up from 44,003 or 16.5% in the first 9 months of 2014). But a big part of that growth comes from Tesla Model S (estimated 17,000 compared to 11,300 year ago).

On the other hand, Chevrolet Volt and Toyota Prius PHV weighed heavily on plug-in hybrid sales, which have been falling not only every month of this year, but 14 months constantly, according to EDTA.

We've seen a significant drop from 44,146 in the first nine months of 2014, to 29,853 so far this year moved the PHEVs (incl. EREV) share among plug-ins to just 31% - its lowest mark in four years.

Now, we await new sales results from the 2016 Chevrolet Volt in October.  Then we will see if the chart once again becomes more balanced, or at least growing on both sides if the new 2016 Nissan LEAF (with 107 mile range option) both arrives and sell decently enough to offset the Volt gains in the last two months of the year.

Plug-In Car Sales in U.S. – September 2015

Plug-In Car Sales in U.S. – September 2015

data source: EDTA