Charging

Charging

Kettering University’s Advanced Power Electronics Lab has been working on power electronics for a couple of years.

One of the topics of team lead by Dr. Kevin Bai, associate professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, is high power, efficient chargers.

After the L2 10 kW charger project with Magna E-Car, they are now developing a 24 kW charger (approximately 95 percent efficient) for a Turkish automotive company.

That's even more than the Tesla Model S and a Nissan LEAF could replenish energy in one hour; if you have enough amps to feed the charger.

Kettering University’s will be three-phase, so it will be more suitable for European markets.

"Dr. Kevin Bai, associate professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and his team of researchers are working with Derindere Motorlu Araclar (DMA), a Turkish automotive company based in Istanbul that is focused on developing electric vehicle integration. The company is helping Turkey reach its goal of producing a 100 percent electric car with their original vehicle design, developed with advanced technology to help build the future electric vehicle industry."

"The electric car market in Turkey has been growing thanks to the high cost of fossil fuels and conventional vehicle taxation structure. Bai is working with a team that includes one research engineer, one postdoctoral fellow and one graduate student. They’re working on a three-phase 380-volt, 24-kilowatt high-efficiency charger that they hope to have completed in the fall."

Dr. Kevin Bai said:

“We are collaborating with DMA on development of a 24-kilowatt charger. This will allow a vehicle to finish charging much faster than the presently existing 3.3kW or 6.6kW on-board charger, which would significantly reduce charging time and acceptance of EVs to customers.”

“We will deliver the charger working prototype to DMA by October.”

Good to hear that electric mobility projects are carried out in Turkey too.

“The success of such collaboration will be a win-win scenario. On one hand, Kettering power electronics team will gain more automotive industrial experience out of this project. On the other hand, DMA is expected to own a high-efficiency charger with lower cost, which makes their EVs more competitive.”

Separately we found video of Dr. Kevin Bai speaking about "Next-Generation Power Electronics Technologies in Vehicle Electrification.":