Chevrolet Volt

Chevrolet Volt

A full 53 months has passed since theNissan LEAF and Chevrolet Volt faintly appeared on the market in December 2010.

In total,l some 324,000 plug-in cars were bought or leased by US consumers in the past 53 months.

After a few years of fast growth from low base, in the last 12 months growth has become slower. Sales peaked in December 2014 at some 13,000 units.

Only two times have sales in a month been lower than the year before by a few percent. In April 2015 the market expanded by just 2%.

As you can see below, the number of EVs on the roads is increasing at a relatively constant pace, but maybe this pace will accelerate with new models, lower prices and longer ranges.

U.S. Plug-In Car Fleet

U.S. Plug-In Car Fleet

Plug-in car market share (in total vehicle market) during the last two years is between 0.5% to 1.0% with peak at 0.88% in September 2014.

On average, 0.74% (one per 135) of cars sold in 2014 were plug-ins, while in the first four months of this year the figure is 0.60% (one per 164).

U.S. Plug-In Car Sales

U.S. Plug-In Car Sales

Lots Of LEAFs By 2035, We Suspect

Lots Of LEAFs By 2035, We Suspect

If you would like to know which models sold in the highest volumes, here we present a pie chart.

Nissan LEAF exceeds Chevrolet Volt, but Volt soon will get reinforcements in the form of the 2016 Volt, while Nissan hasn't unveiled its improved model yet.

In third place is Tesla Model S, which in 2015 is so far the best selling EV in the US. Fourth is Toyota Prius PHEV - currently struggling on the market and awaiting new version.

Two Fords crossed 20,000 milestones in April.

Six of the most popular models cover 86% of the market. Two of them hold almost 48%.

All the numbers come from the InsideEVs' sales scorecard.

U.S. Plug-In Car Sales

U.S. Plug-In Car Sales