Comparison of the 1.4-L Gen-1 Volt engine on left with 2016 Gen-2 1.5-L on right. Note absence of fat orange 400-A cables on the new unit, due to integration of TPIM into drive unit. Photo Credit: Lindsay Brooke

Comparison of the 1.4-L Gen-1 Volt engine on left with 2016 Gen-2 1.5-L on right. Note absence of fat orange 400-A cables on the new unit, due to integration of TPIM into drive unit. Photo Credit: Lindsay Brooke

SAE International recently presented an in-depth article related to the 2016 Chevrolet Volt.

The SAE's Volt article is by far the most informative we've seen thus far, so be sure to check it out in its entirety here.

Rather than rehashing the expertly written SAE article, we'll focus here on only one aspect of the discussion:

"Major changes to the car’s battery, Voltec electric drive system, and gasoline-engine generator—all are essentially new—are expected to increase its overall driving range and energy use by up to 12% compared with the current Volt, he said. The 2015 Volt’s driving range is rated at 380 mi (611 km) after depleting both the 16-kW·h battery and 9.3-gal (32-L) gasoline tank."

*Note: Text should probably be altered as follows:

"are expected to increase its overall driving range and energy use by up to 12% compared with the current Volt,"

Admittedly, we can assume nothing from this 12% figure.  It could simply be that the new 2016 Volt gets a bigger gas tank to go more miles, but if we're right in saying that the text should be altered to state "decrease energy use by up to 12%" then we do know for sure that the next-gen Volt will be more efficient.

What do you make of this 12% statement, which actually comes from Larry Nitz, General Motors' Executive Director of Transmission and Electrification?

*Check out high-resolution images of next-gen Volt components on the SAE's site here.