The WiTricity power source, left, is connected to AC power. The blue lines represent the magnetic near field induced by the power source. The yellow lines represent the flow of energy from the source to the WiTicity capture coil, which is shown powering a light bulb. Note that this diagram also shows how the magnetic field (blue lines) can wrap around a conductive obstacle between the power source and the capture device.

The WiTricity power source, left, is connected to AC power. The blue lines represent the magnetic near field induced by the power source. The yellow lines represent the flow of energy from the source to the WiTicity capture coil, which is shown powering a light bulb. Note that this diagram also shows how the magnetic field (blue lines) can wrap around a conductive obstacle between the power source and the capture device.

New WiTricity CEO Alex Gruzen stated that the company, besides working on base 3.3 kW and 6.6 kW wireless charging solutions, is developing much more capable versions with 10s of kilowatts:

"In addition to the 3.3 kW system we also have a 6.6 kW solution. And we have work underway to to go to 10s of kilowatts. It’s a broadly applicable technology. As the cost comes down, and the size grows, right in parallel, we are going to higher and higher power transfer. We just march in lock step with industry development."

With $25 million in funding obtained late in 2013, WiTricity established a lot of partnerships with Delphi, Toyota, IHI with Mitsubishi Motors, and TDK, which sooner or later should help introduce the first electric cars with WiTricity's wireless charging.

Maximum efficiency of wireless charging exceeds 95%.  However devices must be relatively close to one another and 3.3 kW WiT-3300 is at 90% now.

Maybe because of its partnership with Toyota, or maybe not, Alex Gruzen sees the future of wireless charging in plug-in hybrids:

"The convenience is extraordinary. In many of these vehicles, the battery is relatively smaller. At every point today with a plug-in hybrid, you are presented with a choice of when I pull in to the garage, do I plug in now or not plug in now. When the batteries are smaller , you are not getting all the fuel economy benefit if the battery is not fully charged. The relative value for the plug-in hybrid is the easy topping off of the battery. I feel like there is a real catalyst for dramatically improving the core user experience."

Demonstration of Toyota Prius Plug-In with wireless charging:

Green Car Congress