BMW i3 Battery

BMW i3 Battery

Nissan e-NV200 Battery

Nissan e-NV200 Battery

A peer-reviewed Mineta National Transit Research Consortium report, titled Remanufacturing, Repurposing, and Recycling of Post-Vehicle-Application Lithium-Ion Batteries, suggests that there are three reasonable second-life uses for automotive lithium-ion batteries:

  • Remanufacturing for reuse in vehicles by replacing any damaged cells
  • Repurposing by reengineering battery for stationary storage application.
  • Recycling by disassembling each battery cell and extracting the metals, chemicals and other byproducts to be sold or re-introduced into battery manufacturing process
Post-vehicle applications for lithium-ion batteries will become increasingly important in the coming years as the first modern-day electric vehicles reach an age in which depletion of battery capacity makes them unsuitable for automotive use.

Charles R. Standridge, PhD, lead researcher of the study, stated:

“Lithium-ion batteries provide efficient energy storage. Their use in vehicles will continue to expand, but we must deal with disposition once they fall below regulatory standards for use in on-road vehicles. To address that challenge, our studies have shown that many of these batteries may still hold a significant charge level and thus have additional economic value that can be reclaimed in one of three ways.”

The study predicts that, by 2035, the number of available post-vehicle-application batteries will range from 1.376 million to 6.759 million.  That's a heck of a lot of batteries that will be looking for second-life applications.

Full Report in PDF Form here