Delta EV Quick Charger

Delta EV Quick Charger

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries announced that Delta Electronics will acquire its business assets, including machinery, in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. So, the previous Nikkei report was indeed true.

"Delta Electronics is the core enterprise of the Taiwan-based Delta Group. The company undertakes operations encompassing a diverse lineup of electronic products including power and thermal management solutions, and as an enterprise of global scale it has approximately 200 facilities worldwide including production, sales and R&D functions."

We know Delta Electronics from its charging equipment, including the Delta EV Quick Charger and Delta AC Charger, which as it turns out were used by ECOtality as Blink HQ.

Delta AC Charger

Delta AC Charger

MHI stated that it will now shift its management resources into operations in energy storage system (ESS) products that employ lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

"ESS products today are expected to record sustained market growth ahead as core devices for achieving power network stabilization in tandem with the introduction of wind power, solar power and other renewable energies, and for adjusting power supply vis-à-vis demand in order to save energy."

"The lithium-ion rechargeable batteries developed by MHI are light in weight, compact in size and high in reliability. The company boasts an abundant track record in this field, its batteries being widely used in diverse products ranging from electric buses to ESS products, including container-based systems. Following the sale, MHI will focus on expanding the market for ESS products."

MHI will still be selling ESS products and using Delta Electronic lithium-ion cells as both companies already announced plans to join forces in pursuing further development of the lithium-ion rechargeable battery business.

Summing it up, it seems that selling the cell manufacturing part of the business to Delta Electronics is a form of an alliance and/or at the same time a solution for MHI, which perhaps didn't want to invest more to expand production capacity above 66,000 kWh annually.