Norway loves EV, but plug-in hybrids not so much. The result is that EVs take all the incentives.

When we look at the price list for the beginning of 2014, we see that some models have much lower prices than others. For example, it is possible to buy Mitsubishi i-MiEV for just 10% more than MetroBuddy, which is so tiny that even a kei-car next to it makes the i-MiEV look like a limousine.

VW e-Up! Ad

VW e-Up! Ad

Volkswagen e-Up! is actually a little cheaper than Mitsubishi i-MiEV, Citroen C-Zero and Peugeot iOn and at this price (over $31,000) it seems to attract a lot customers.

BMW i3 in base version ($40,800) is just several percent more expensive than the Nissan LEAF ($38,300), but it's still cheaper than the Ford Focus Electric ($43,700).

The big winner in Norway is of course Tesla, because the higher the price of an EV, the higher the percentage tax-cut. At 461K Norwegian krone ($75,200), Model S is at comparable level with Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV. Don't count on Outlander PHEV being a sales success in Norway like it is in the Netherlands.

Additionally, the Opel Ampera at 369,900 kr (over $60,000) and Toyota Prius plug-in at 337,200 kr (about $55,000) can't succeed in sales when EVs are so much cheaper. The same thing is true with the Volvo V60 plug-in at 617,300 kr (over $100,000).

What is interesting is that Norway still doesn't get the Renault ZOE, but Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG Coupé Electric Drive is on sale for "just" $465,000. Just? Just, because the plug-in Porsche 918 Spyder cost over two times more!

Prices in Norway in Norwegian krone

Prices in Norway in Norwegian krone

Source: GRØNN BIL