CNBC Tweeted First That Tesla Was Not Considering A Recall

CNBC Tweeted First That Tesla Was Not Considering A Recall

Recent Tesla Model S Fire In Tennessee

Recent Tesla Model S Fire In Tennessee

After a recent accident that saw a Tesla Model S ignite after running over a tow hitch (which impaled the bottom of the car and damaged the vehicle's 85 kWh battery), there had been some speculation if Tesla was considering a voluntary recall to install additional battery protection for current Model S owners.

Voluntary recalls due to media scrutiny are not without precedence in the plug-in segment.

In January of 2012, after a Chevrolet Volt caught fire at a NHSTA testing facility three weeks after being crashed by the agency, General Motors decided to issue a "safety enhancement" for those owners who might be concerned an electric vehicle fire.

NHSTA Volt Fire (click to enlarge)

NHSTA Volt Fire (click to enlarge)

At the time Mary Barra, GM’s senior VP of global product development, stressed this enhancement was not at the behest of the NHSTA,but that GM was “choosing to go the extra mile to ensure our customers’ peace of mind.”  No Chevrolet Volt has since caught fire.

 

Today however, CNBC first reported (via twitter) that at least for now, Tesla is not considering any such action:

"Source tells #CNBC that there has been no discussion of a Tesla Model S recall. • $TSLA shares down 5% today"

Elon Musk

Elon Musk "Definitely" No Tesla Model S Recall Coming

Then later in the day Tesla CEO Elon Musk hit the airwaves in person saying that there "definitely won’t be a recall."

At the New York Times DealBook conference Musk said that, “We’re about five times less likely to have a fire than an average gasoline car."  The CEO also said that public reaction to the fires reported by some media outlets was “extremely inaccurate and unreasonable.”

Previous to the current fire, a previous incident of the Model S catching fire after striking some road debris in October was cleared by the NHSTA; although it should be noted that at the time of the accident that the agency was not operational due to a US government shutdown.