While The Average kWh Goes For Around 12.5 Cents In The US, That Figures Varies Wildly By State

While The Average kWh Goes For Around 12.5 Cents In The US, That Figures Varies Wildly By State

It is a given that plug-in cars are much cheaper to "fill-up" than their gas counterparts.

However, the question of "how much does it cost me to drive electrically" is usually understood on an individual basis regionally, as electricity costs across the US fluctuates wildly.  Worse still by country.

As an example inside the US - the cheapest electricity on average in the US could be found in Washington at 8.87 cents per kWh, while Hawaii is naturally top of the mountain at 36.61 cents, and California checks in at 16.71 cents.  The US national average is currently 12.61 cents. (You can find your home states average price here)

It Costs About $6.50 To Drive 100 Miles In A Tesla Model S In America

It Costs About $6.50 To Drive 100 Miles In A Tesla Model S In America

In simpler terms, if you drive a 2013 Nissan LEAF (or any of the other cars rated around 115 MPGe), you are going to pay around $3.50 cents on average to travel 100 miles - $2.50 in Washington, $10 in Hawaii and a little under $5.00 in California.  If you happen to drive a Tesla Model S you probably don't really care it costs about 30% more per mile to operate than a LEAF.

So, what about the rest of the world?  The good folks at Shrink That Footprint have put together a handy chart so we can all get a little perspective.

Nutshell:  Denmark - not so good.  India, China and Canada - pretty cheap.

Electricity Costs Are About 525% higher In Denmark As Compared To India

Electricity Costs Are About 525% higher In Denmark As Compared To India

On average in Denmark it costs about $12 to drive 100 miles in a LEAF, $14.50 in a Chevy Volt, $15.50 in a Model S.  (Mind you Danes do pay about $8.25 per gallon on average at the pump)

Thankfully, STF goes us one better and works out the numbers based on US dollars purchasing power parity amongst the countries to give us a little more prospective; surprisingly Germany comes up last - Canada first:

All Things Being Equal, Canada Actually Comes Out On Top For Cheap Energy

All Things Being Equal, Canada Actually Comes Out On Top For Cheap Energy

EIA, Shrink That Footprint