What's squatting?  Well, if we throw aside the usual definition and instead focus on how it applies to plug-in vehicles, then the description of squatting takes on a different meaning.

Please Don't Squat Here

Please Don't Squat Here

With the rise of plug-in vehicles, charging station etiquette is increasingly becoming an issue.  Squatting is one of those avoid-at-all-costs issues.

The most obvious definition of squatting, as it applies to plug in vehicles, is when a battery-powered vehicle occupies a charging spot all day with no intention of ever charging.  It simply sits there without ever being plugged in.  This prevents those in need of a charge from using that station.  It's illegal in most states now, but it still is a common sight to see.  There's typically a reason why squatting like this occurs and it's directly related to the location of the charging/parking spot.  If it's in a prime location (let's say it's one of the nearest parking spots at a mall), then it gets squatted.

The second form of squatting is less intentional, but still irks most plug-in vehicle owners.  This is when a vehicle continues to occupy a charging/parking spot long after the charge is complete.  The proper etiquette here would be to move your plug-in vehicle shortly after (let's go with a 1-hour grace period) the charge is complete.  It's not always possible to move a charged vehicle in a timely manner, but occupying a spot all day long when others could be using it is not the right way either.

Proper charging etiquette would solve these issues.  So to would more charging stations.  Charging stations cost money.  Etiquette is free of financial fees.

There was one more solution suggested and it might just work.  For charging stations that aren't free to use, an increased fee could come into affect one hour after charging is complete.  This won't do anything for those squatting under the first scenario laid out above, but it would probably work wonders to extinguish the second type of squatter.

Source: EV World