Although Likely Never To Be Read By Anyone, Your Comments Will Be Electronically Stored Here Forever

Although Likely Never To Be Read By Anyone, Your Comments Will Be Electronically Stored Here Forever

The Department of Energy (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy) through the National Archives and Records Administration has put out a tender for public comment on its freshly minted "EV Everywhere" Grand Challenge.

What is the "EV Everywhere" challenge you ask?

According to the DOE, "The EV Everywhere Grand Challenge is a U.S. Department of Energy “Clean Energy Grand Challenge” with the goal of enabling U.S. companies to be the first in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years. President Obama announced the EV Everywhere Challenge on March 7, 2012."

This EV Everywhere challenge is actually the second of the government's Clean Energy Grand Challenges.  It is hoped this program will lead the way to having companies (inside the US) produce EVs that are inexpensive, while offering improved electric ranges, along with a vast (and faster) charging infrastructure.

Translation:  There is a $1 billion National Community Deployment Challenge, and $650 million of it has to be spent for advance vehicle and battery tech, and the government figures they should probably talk to 'the people' before handing out the cheques this time...because it didn't go so well from a PR standpoint last time.

Who Knew The Government Even Kept A Journal?

Who Knew The Government Even Kept A Journal?

Some highlights of the topics the government is looking for comments on:

EV Everywhere Mission and Scope: Is the mission statement, “to enable U.S. companies to be the first in the world to produce plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) that are as affordable and convenient for the average American family as today's gasoline-powered vehicles within the next 10 years” appropriate for the technology development and deployment programs of the Department? Is the goal of developing “PEVs with a payback time of less than 5 years and sufficient range and fast-charging ability to allow the average American family to meet their daily transportation needs” appropriate? Is a payback time of less than 5 years the right measure of affordability or is there a more appropriate metric? Should the scope be limited to “PEVs in which the majority of miles driven are electric” or should the goal be “to maximize the national total of electric vehicle miles driven”?

Plug-in Electric Vehicle Scenarios. DOE has identified three potential vehicle/infrastructure scenarios that might achieve the EV Everywhere goals. These scenarios are:Show citation box

  • 1. A plug-in hybrid electric vehicle with a 40-mile all-electric range (PHEV-40) with limited fast-charge infrastructure;
  • 2. An all-electric vehicle with a 100-mile range (AEV-100) with significant intra-city and inter-city fast charge infrastructure; and
  • 3. An all-electric vehicle with a 300-mile range (AEV-300) with significant inter-city fast charge infrastructure.
  • Have we correctly identified and structured these three scenarios?

Are there other scenarios that are more appropriate?

U.S. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Leadership. How can DOE activities best support leadership in plug-in electric vehicle innovation? In PEV manufacturing? In PEV deployment? How do we balance international competitiveness against international cooperation?

So if you feel like letting the government know how you feel about the "EV Everywhere Grand Challenge"  or would just like to know more about the program, then head on over to the official Federal Register.

(Federal Register via Green Car Congress)