Nearly 30,000 Pure Electric Cars Sold In Europe In First Half Of 2014


Nissan LEAF in the UK

Nissan LEAF in the UK

Sales of all-electric cars increased in Europe by 77% in the first half of the year to a new high of 29,017.

Those number do not include plug-in hybrids, so believe it or not, for pure EVs – Europe is ahead of the US; which after six months of 2014 saw sales of roughly 25,300 all-electric cars and more than 30,000 plug-ins with ICE engines (PHEV, EREVs, REx) on-board. In only PHEV statistics, the US is well ahead of Europe.

Let’s move on to the countries with highest sales. Norway opens  with 9,950 EVs sold YTD – more than four times then in 2013! More stunning is however the market share of 33%!

In second is France with 6,405, which not only lost its first position a year earlier, but has lower sales by 12% and lost some market share (from 44% to 22%) compared to in 2013 when 7,293 EVs were sold.

Third is Germany – 4,230 EVs and fourth UK – 2,570. Both countries more or less doubled EV market this year.

Fifth, and the last above 1,000, is the Netherlands – 1,149. Netherlands grew by more than 160%.

Switzerland with 867 is ahead of Austria709, Italy – 648, Belgium629, Denmark604 and Sweden585.

All the rest of Europe adds another 1,071.

Category: Sales

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15 responses to "Nearly 30,000 Pure Electric Cars Sold In Europe In First Half Of 2014"
  1. Brian says:

    I’m glad to see Europeans have embraced EVs. That fact, combined with BMW and VW investing in more and more EVs, makes the future look even brighter!

  2. kdawg says:

    “so believe it or not, for pure EVs – Europe is ahead of the US”

    Makes sense…. shorter driving distances on average compared to US drivers.

    1. Spec9 says:

      Probably more the higher gas prices.

      1. Mikael says:

        Which both helps but doesn’t make pure EV’s practical nor economic anyway.

        The biggest reasons are still a higher environmental awareness and a stronger will from the people and governments/municipals.

  3. Kalle says:

    Yay! 🙂
    We “ev-preachers” still have some work to do tho..
    Over here (Sweden) most ppl don’t even Know that evs exist

    1. Assaf says:

      Just arrange a weekend trip to Oslo for them…

  4. Suprise Cat says:

    Now resort it per capita.

  5. Mike says:

    NOT Enough.
    Exxon still going to spend Billions on a Belgium refinery to crack Canadian Tar Sands.

    So, If you don’t move on Electric you’re going to get this massive pollution source.

    1. Mikael says:

      “Despite extremely low margins and industry-wide losses in Europe, due primarily to excess refining capacity, ExxonMobil is investing for the long term in its strategic Antwerp refinery. The investment addresses an industry shortfall in capability to convert fuel oil to products such as diesel.

      This project demonstrates ExxonMobil’s long-term view and disciplined approach toward business investments, and is the first of several being evaluated to further strengthen strategic refineries in Europe to more successfully face the challenging industry environment. ”

      Cut from an Exxon press message.

      In a region where less and less petrol and diesel is being used and the trend is a downward spiral which will cut the fossil diesel/petrol at a mandatory minimum of 32% (27% in higher mpg and 5% renewable fuels) until 2020 how does that investment make any sense what so ever?

      If you are about to fall of a cliff, what do you do. a) get a parachute, b) get a jet-pack, c) jump out of the vehicle heading for the cliff, d) put on your really cool 80’s diving weight belt.

  6. ffbj says:

    Since gas is twice as expensive in Europe as opposed to the U.S. it makes perfect sense that sales would be higher there.

    1. Assaf says:

      Well, until this year they have been lower, because

      1. Much of Europe has suffered from a deeper economic slump than the US

      2. Americans tend to buy new cars far more often than most Europeans

      3. Till now, European automakers with the exception of Renault(-Nissan) have been slow to crank these out, and there is a lot of local-patriotism in major automaking countries such as Germany and Italy, i.e., many people prefer to buy the local brands. In particular, now that German automakers are joining the EV world en masse, we are seeing the Germans buying far more EVs. I won’t be surprised if they overtake Norway in absolute sales counts (not per-capita) by this time next year.

    2. Mikael says:

      Gas price being twice as high is not a big factor really. It has been a big factor to get fuel efficient cars on the road and to choose a better life style not so car oriented.

      You have to take into consideration that electricity prices in some countries are as much as triple the prices in the US. In for example Germany and Denmark where the price for electricity is extremely high.

      Also that we drive less (shorter distances, living closer to work, different life style, flying when going longer distances, better public transport etc.)

      And that we generally have very fuel efficient cars. The average mpg of new cars sold in the EU is at 45 mpg and in France it’s 50 mpg.
      The average weight for a new car is 3000 pounds.

      So the economic reason to buy an EV would often be much greater in the US where you can go from a gas guzzler with low mpg, get cheap electricity and get more EV miles because of longer distance travelled (which helps the cost comparison to the gas car). Assuming it’s a long commute to work and not a few very long road trips which makes up the miles.

  7. Spec9 says:

    Yeah, the fact that VW and BMW are having EVs hit the market should cause a nice boost in sales. There is a pretty big NIH syndrome in Germany.

    1. Mikael says:

      Those additions will be a big boost in sales. But not so much because of a NIH syndrome, that one is much bigger in the US (and even more so in Japan and South Korea) but because they make better cars than most.

      Those VW and Audi plugins will sell in great numbers outside Germany too.

  8. Surya says:

    While Belgium only has 629 YTD, last year was only 300 for the whole year, so a 400% increase is possible, a 300% increase is almost certain