In Preparation For Model 3 Launch, Tesla Makes Moves On Repair Front

APR 27 2017 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 11

Tesla

Tesla’s largest service center is currently located in Hong Kong

Tesla will now offer its Tesla Approved Body shop program online, and welding training and recertification will be handled by I-CAR.

Tesla needs to expand its repair services quickly and efficiently, ahead of the Model 3 production ramp up. The automaker is moving from in-house, California-based certification courses, to those offered via the internet. An email from the company to its current certified repair centers reads:

“Building on the past 5 years of experience, we have been able to evaluate and dramatically simplify training, and will no longer require instructor led, onsite training. We have developed online training as a more time and cost effective way to train your technicians to be approved for Tesla repairs.

Online training offers many benefits not possible solely with instructor led training, such as unlimited reviewing of procedures, more frequent class offerings and updates for the network, and less time to train our whole technician population vs cycling everyone through constrained classrooms. Cost to you is greatly reduced, as weeks of lost production and travel expenses are eliminated as well. …

Tesla

Tesla Service Center

“Structural technicians will no longer have to travel to Tesla for onsite weld training and recertification. We have created an arrangement with ICAR to achieve the necessary qualification, without the expense of lost production and travel previously required.”

While all of this sounds like welcome news, and should help Tesla with the upcoming increase in service center needs, there are some issues to consider.

First of all, will these internet trained technicians possess the abilities of those that were previously trained in-house? And, how will the current technicians feel about the fact that they spent time and money to get the proper in-house training, and now the incoming workers will simply have to access the internet?

It seems that Tesla had already thought some of this through, so as to curb possible concerns. The automaker told current service centers:

“We are thrilled for the opportunity to drive more work to our network shops while minimizing the increased costs. Like you, we recognize how unique and exceptional the Tesla instructor led training was within the industry, and we are also acutely aware of the massive commitment you as shop owners and your technicians have made to be part of the Program. As we continue to simplify the Tesla Approved Body Shop program, we are working on new pricing structures for parts and repair advisory that will take into account the level of engagement and investment made by our founding partners that will forever be ‘Factory Trained’.”

Research has shown that online courses are not a preferred method of training over hands-on, classroom-based training. We don’t think that it really takes research to understand this. Anyone can access the internet, and there is no proper way to gauge a student’s understanding without being face to face. However, many companies are moving to this sort of method today. This is becoming the way of the future. The hope is that a service center’s veteran technicians will always oversee the work of “rookies,” and realistically, most of the best “training” happens on the job sight.

Added to this, much of the online training will be offered to current employees as refresher and recertification courses. This is also becoming the norm across many industries. Employees must be reassessed, retested, refreshed, and/or recertified every so often, and it happens via periodic online training modules. Tesla Service center’s can begin utilizing courses now and Tesla will reimburse for all paid training.

Source: Repairer Driven News

Categories: Tesla

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11 Comments on "In Preparation For Model 3 Launch, Tesla Makes Moves On Repair Front"

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ffbj

Open your eyes, let’s begin to drive. Brand new day, brand new way to live.
The Model 3 is coming our way..Drive with me on sunlight someday…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEjjuCVGgrg

Robert

IMO online training is good as a follow up training to a classroom training. To only have online training is a mistake. Tesla should consider opening training schools across the country & around the world with online training as backup for the techs.

Nix

It appears that some may believe that this story means that ALL of the training will be done online. That is not entirely correct.

The structural training that ICAR will now provide will still be done in person, it will simply be done in person with ICAR instructors, not at the Tesla factory.

“Structural technicians will no longer have to travel to Tesla for onsite weld training and recertification. We have created an arrangement with ICAR to achieve the necessary qualification”

Here are the classes that ICAR provides for structural welding:

https://www.i-car.com/Home/Educational-Programs/Welding-Training-Certification/Welding-Courses

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As you can see, ICAR’s structural courses for welding are all “In Shop, Hands On”

Nix

Tesla is actually adopting similar practices by outsourcing training to ICAR as a long list of other OE manufactures, including Audi/VW, Ford, GM, Toyota, etc.

https://www.i-car.com/Home/Educational-Programs/OEM-Training-Requirements

This is actually a sign of Tesla maturing and shifting to industry standards instead of spending their own money on expensive training classes for skills like welding, that ICAR can do better and cheaper.

Pushmi-Pullyu

Thanks once again, Nix, for your insight and input here. If Tesla is merely moving toward the industry standard, that eases my concerns quite a bit.

John

At the heart, a Tesla is still a car. A good tech trained how to repair cars will do just fine with the online training that outlines the Tesla Specifics…like…”DON’T CUT THE ORANGE CABLES”

SJC

If Tesla makes the obvious good moves of more chargers and service centers, they could do well.

Kosh

I wish my woodshop was that clean and organized…

Pushmi-Pullyu

“Research has shown that online courses are not a preferred method of training over hands-on, classroom-based training. We don’t think that it really takes research to understand this.”

Indeed, anyone with even a bit of common sense should see this without needing to be told.

Will Tesla send an instructor out to certify these new mechanics and service techs whose training was only virtual, rather than hands-on?

Or will owners of Teslae now have to settle for their cars being serviced by people who will, essentially, be getting on-the-job training rather than being fully certified before they’re allowed to start working on actual customers’ cars?

I understand that Tesla needs to expand its service centers rapidly, but trading quality for quantity seems like a losing proposition for Tesla. 🙁

I very much hope to be proven wrong here!

JIMJFOX

Admittedly, this sounds a really stupid idea but is there a benefit in going back to bolted construction? Modern tooling & materials might make it feasible; I’m just thinking of some of the appalling welding I’ve seen in a lifetime of structural engineering and how messy it is to rectify, specially the paintwork.
Even an old fool like me can handle bolted connections & they are more easily checked than welds, no training required.
New panel- DIY, easy.

JeffD

I would think that even for online training that there would be some kind of certification test to make sure you got the necessary knowledge out of the learning experience.