Model 3 Appears At Geneva Motor Show, But Not Tesla

MAR 9 2018 BY MARK KANE 6

Tesla wasn’t present at the Geneva Motor Show, but since we found the Audi e-tron in camouflage, how hard could it be to find a Tesla Model 3?

Caresoft Global – Tesla Model 3

As it turns out, there is one Model 3 at the show, at the Caresoft Global stand.

Caresoft Global is a company that apparently purchased several first Model 3s (at more than $100,000 per unit) for the purpose of analyzing, disassembling and then selling technical information to competitors at a profit.

It’s sort of ironic to see that the Tesla Model 3 in Geneva was made possible by a company that, through its activities, contributes to a decreasing market advantage for Tesla.

See Also – Dual-Motor AWD Tesla Model 3 Spotted Out Driving

Source: automobile-propre.com

Categories: Tesla

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6 Comments on "Model 3 Appears At Geneva Motor Show, But Not Tesla"

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Do any of their “insights” gained fall under patent protection?

There’s lots of things that are easily reverse engineered, but are patented. Certain tools, for example, when they are first invented and remain under patent protection.

I don’t have a link handy. But I recall Elon Musk stating that Tesla patents were open to all. He invoked the spirit of driving EV adoption to the masses in his statements several years ago.

(⌐■_■) Trollnonymous

“for the purpose of analyzing, disassembling and then selling technical information to competitors at a profit.”

Isn’t that “Industrial Espionage”?

My first reaction to reading about a company which profits off doing a tear-down of another company’s car, taking detailed measurements, and selling the info to that company’s rivals, was “What a bunch of scumbags!”

But really, if you think about it, where is the actual issue or ethical violation?

Is it wrong for someone to do a teardown in their garage of at Tesla Model S battery pack, taking multiple close-up pictures, and posting them to the Internet, as seen in the link below? I would say “No”.

https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/pics-info-inside-the-battery-pack.34934/

Would it be wrong for such a person to, rather than post openly the info he gained and the pictures he made to the Internet, to offer that privately to anyone willing to meet his price? Doesn’t he deserved to be compensated for his efforts and his technical expertise?

I don’t think it qualifies as “espionage” when you’re just examining and taking detailed measurements of one copy of something sold to the public. But admittedly that’s the first step towards reverse engineering something, which may well be a violation of patent rights, or (if it’s software) a violation of copyrights.

“Is it wrong for someone to do a teardown in their garage of at Tesla Model S battery pack, taking multiple close-up pictures, and posting them to the Internet, as seen in the link below? I would say “No”.”
Actually, that’s not cut and dry.
W.r.t. software, for example, lot of programs aren’t sold to the end user, but licensed for use, and an explicit condition of the licensing is that the user not attempt any reverse engineering (decompilation / disassembly, in the cas of SW), and, may only sell his/her license onwards to a 3d party if they agree to abide by the same condition. In many jurisdictions, such a condition is valid, incl. the US, AFAIK.

In principle, something similar could be applied to a physical product, although I don’t know if Tesla does this.

Maybe the other companies will actually make efforts to build a compelling electric car…you know, like Tesla has been trying to show them for years. If they do, it would seem to be advancing Tesla’s mission statement. Give ’em h-ll, Elon!