Mitsubishi Recalls 6,517 Outlander PHEVs; Faulty Software Can Drain Battery, Cause Vehicle To Stall

APR 4 2014 BY JAY COLE 7

We Checked Out The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV At The Geneva Motor Show This Year

We Checked Out The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV At The Geneva Motor Show This Year

It’s not the first recall for the Outlander PHEV, and they way things are going it probably won’t be last.

Mitsubishi Brought a Cutaway Outlander PHEV To Demonstrate The Location Of The 12 kWh Battery Pack To The Geneva Motor Show

Mitsubishi Brought a Cutaway Outlander PHEV To Demonstrate The Location Of The 12 kWh Battery Pack To The 2014 Geneva Motor Show

Today Mitsubishi announced the third recall of its extended range Outlander PHEV, this time over software glitches; ironically enough – 3 of them.

Thankfully, and unlike the last recall that saw some 4,000 vehicles returned for quite a serious problem with the traction batteries that halted production for 5 months (and delayed the US launch), no production downtime is expected and the fix is a simple one.

That being said, more Outlander PHEVs have been built, so the recall now encompasses 6,517 vehicles that were built between January and November of 2013 at Mitsu’s Okazaki plant in Japan.

The recall focuses on a software glitch in the battery monitoring unit that could have the plug-in SUV still consuming battery power while it was parked; rendering it unable to start.

Of those 6,517 recalls, 4,621 of them also have a software flaw that can cause the Outlander PHEV to stall due to a miscalculation in how much power is left available its 12 kWh lithium-ion battery, or if the petrol engine’s spark plugs are covered in too much residue – in which case that engine won’t turn on after the battery is depleted.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Interior (2014 Geneva)

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Interior (2014 Geneva)

A Mitsubishi spokesperson says that no accidents or injuries have been reported due to the software glitches.

As a fix, Mitsubishi will re-install new software and also replace spark plugs in the Outlander PHEV.  Mitsubishi figures that the repair should take no longer than 1.5 hours to complete.

Mitsubishi says that a further 1,800 vehicles in Europe could also have a glitch in the battery monitoring unit, but the decision to recall them has not be made yet as they are evaluating the problem

On the bright side for those annoyed at the slow launch of the Outlander PHEV in the United States, it should be a well-oiled machine by the time it arrives!

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7 Comments on "Mitsubishi Recalls 6,517 Outlander PHEVs; Faulty Software Can Drain Battery, Cause Vehicle To Stall"

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Probably a good thing the US launch isn’t until next year…

MrEnergyCzar

Sure, they’re getting out all the bugs.

This SUV should FLY off the shelves here in America. It would’ve been nice if it were a tad more future-forward in design, but there’s plenty of folks who like the traditional look – plus, Hey, it’s an SUV, not a fashion statement.

Land Rover hit on something with the Evoque though – and I believe an EV-PHEV CUV should evoque ( sorry! 🙂 ) a style that sets it apart – just not apart like i3-apart…haha

“if the petrol engine’s spark plugs are covered in too much residue – in which case that engine won’t turn on after the battery is depleted.”

I have NEVER heard of anything like that. It suspiciously sounds like a fix for something incognito.

Get it here in the states with the bugs sprayed out of it and it’s mine!

TO querty: what do you mean, you never heard of “spark plugs covered in too much residue”? It happenes all the time with lawn mowers, when you pump too much gas in and spark plugs are wet and the engine doesnt want to start.

Re: “replace spark plugs” — but does that require replacing them?!? I’ve flooded my vehicle in the cold cold winters up north and we ended up replacing the oil because of the fuel getting in it.

I thought they sorted this out domestically in Japan. Looks like their faith in doing it correctly the first time round looks a little shaky.

Should have ran more software simulations to pick this up.

Think GM with IBM did way better with Volts software testing by comparison.

Nice this will be ironed out. Yes, early adopters have the benefit/burden of these things.

I really would like a better idea of what this will cost when it does hit the US shores. Prices seem to vary in the present markets.