Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Sales Recover In Japan

JUL 2 2014 BY MARK KANE 9

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

While Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV experienced some sales recovery in May after collapse in April, the all-electric i-MiEV, along with Minicab derivatives, did not fare as well in Japan.

We are sad to admit that despite lower prices and a better equipped version of i-MiEV, sales stuck in Japan. Last month, just 25 i-MiEVs were sold, plus 22 Minicab-MiEVs or Minicab-MiEV Trucks.

Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV with 563 units sold in Japan in May is closing in on 4,500 units YTD and is on track for over 10,000 this year in Japan. For comparison, in 2013, Outlander PHEV sales amounted to 9,608.

Over 6,000 Outlander PHEVs sold in Europe in the first five months indicates to us that Mitsubishi is on track for 15,000 Outlander PHEV sales in its largest market for plug-ins (at least this forecast seems accurate based on the first fivte months of 2014).

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9 Comments on "Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Sales Recover In Japan"

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qwerty

Sell this here in the United States of SUV and they will be on schedule for 25,000 for the year.

GM won’t make anything like this, it makes too much sense…

Boyd

I thought GM had plans for “two other plug-in variants” … just saying that I would not rule out a Volt CUV (equinox size).

jmac

The Outlander is a hit. Please bring it to U.S.

Is it a battery shortage issue ?

Maybe Elon Musk is right when he says we need giga-factories making batteries.

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The Outlander just might be the car that crosses over and becomes widely popular and in demand with the ICE crowd.

qwerty

From a lot of articles, it sounds like it’s battery supply issue and it’s a proprietary Pouch sized prismatic pack.

I wonder if the Tesla Gigafactory will produce only 18650 cells like they use now or will they change to 26650 or pouch style.

I predict 26650 will be the next form factor they will use.

DaveMart

Yep.
Its a battery shortage issue.
I would imagine that any weakness in Japanese Outlander PHEV sales are due to their diverting cars to Europe, Australia and so on.

William Edwards

No, supply is not stopping the phev from making it to the US, per say. The vehicle is missing some battery monitoring that they need for CARB to certify.

There have been more details about the recent issue on this site.

Alok

Mark, do you have any info on whether it’s a production (due to battery supply shortage) or demand issue?
Inventory levels?
Maybe a phone call to Mitsu…?

The explanation of Mitsubishi wanting to use all (or most?) batteries for the Outlander (therefor, supply issue) would seem to be the most likely.
On the other side, one would say that it’s a bit (or a lot) odd to slash the price when you can only produce a few of them (unless you cannot sell even the few you’re building). But if the situation is more like “no production at all”, then it might be OK to slash the price (good publicity and no loss of revenues anyway).

Jay Cole

We actually covered this a bit recently.

Mitsu was planning on it coming this year, but a little disagreement/misunderstanding of getting the vehicle into the US has delayed it until later next year.

The heart of the issue is that CARB wants a battery monitoring unit in new PHEVs that reports on battery degradation and emission results.

Now whether or not Mitsu was made aware of this, and how long did they know before they attempted in bring in the Outlander PHEV is up for debate.

They probably could have still gotten to the US, but only a couple months late this year if they really wanted to…but the Outlander PHEV is selling as fast as they can build them, so in the end they just decided to dalay US launch until they made the necessary change as part of the 2016 MY (fall of 2015).

We wrote a story (and spoke directly to CARB) about it….you can check it out here if you like:

http://insideevs.com/california-delays-mitsubishi-outlander-phevs-us-debut/

DaveMart

Mitsubishi have a price policy, and a price point, and are ploughing on with it even though demand is through the roof.