Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Sales Exceed 100,000

2 years ago by Eric Loveday 27

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

2017 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV

Since its launch in Japan in early 2013, the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV has been wildly successful in terms of sales volume, perhaps even more successful than Mitsubishi had ever thought it would be.

Just recently, the Outlander PHEV eclipsed 100,000 sales, cumulatively. Outlander joins only 3 other plug-in cars in the over-100,000 club. Those cars are the Nissan LEAF. Tesla Model S, and the Chevrolet Volt (along with its siblings).

The 100,000 sales for the Outlander PHEV really stand out since this SUV is not even sold in the U.S. The other 3 plug-ins with over 100,000 sales are all available in the States.

Mitsubishi says that it will finally offer the Outlander PHEV in the U.S. later this year, but after countless delays in getting the SUV here, we’re not so sure we believe this statement.

Hybrid Cars has a partial breakdown for Outlander PHEV sales. Here’s a look:

“…a full two-thirds of the Outlander PHEV’s cumulative global sales – 66,000 – were in Europe.”

“Japan reportedly accounted for 33,741, and a trickle of sales came from Australia, with 1,500, and 300 in New Zealand through Dec. 2015.”

“Other sub-markets contributed to the tally as well, but in sum, the total is an estimated 101,900 through March.”

Source: Hybrid Cars

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27 responses to "Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV Sales Exceed 100,000"

  1. Ash09 says:

    They’re missing the boat on not releasing it in the US yet, where there’s a lot of demand for trucks and SUV’s at the moment.

    1. RexxSee says:

      Well because it is a very successful PHEV, it is delayed here to follow the “compliance” only politic of the ICE car/Big Oil cartel.

    2. Stephen D says:

      If they’re missing the boat, what about GM, Ford et al missing the market for PHEV SUVs entirely?

      1. EV AZ says:

        Exactly! What happened to the Ford Escape PHEV?

    3. ModernMarvelFan says:

      That is because Outlander PHEV enjoys more incentives in EU than US…

      Once those EU incentives are gone, Mitsubishi will start it here in the US.

      1. Ricardo PHEV says:

        So not true… I am European, I have an Outlander PHEV, and here the price of the PHEV is the same of the diesel version.
        Don’t say lies when you don’t now what you are talking about!

  2. Get Real says:

    Yes, but GM is squandering this opportunity to dominate even more by not putting their excellent Voltec system into at least 1 phev CUV/SUV!

  3. After 3 years, it’s about time to put a little more battery into such fat car.

    1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

      It sells well because it is relatively cheap. Bigger battery is expensive and takes space, and not absolutely essential when you have ICE anyway. They are planning all electric Outlander Sport in 2019 but you need redesign a lot to do it properly, not just drop battery in the trunk.

    2. vdiv says:

      That CHAdeMO plug along with a network do wonders, even with the puny battery on the fat car. 🙂

      1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

        DC plug for 20-30 mile range 12 kWh car makes zero sense. Why would anybody need it, to stop every 20 miles and waste half an hour at some 20 kW charging rate, doing nothing and greatly annoying battery car owners who badly need that occupied charger? Such plugins should not have any fast charger access until infrastructure is improved to the point when there are plenty of free chargers available at charging station. Maybe it makes some minimal sense in Japan where Chademo is used for slow chargers too, but for charging in US or Europe it is bad idea.

        1. vdiv says:

          You are looking at it the other way around. If one stops at a CHAdeMO station for other reasons why not plug in? The biggest pain in the ass with my Volt was the slow 3 kW or 10 mph charging making it impractical to drive it all electric on “longer” trips.

          1. WARREN says:

            Half the cars I see at public charging stations are Volts. It is such a huge contrast to see them take 2hrs to get 24 miles of charge, compared to the 10 minutes it takes me in the i3 for the same amount of range. Took me 10 minutes to pick up 7kWh yesterday.

  4. Pete says:

    Hope they don’t broke down after the swindle, they were on the right path with the fully electric EX-Concept.

  5. Spider-Dan says:

    I look forward to its release in the U.S. in March of 2022.

    1. Speculawyer says:

      lol

    2. zzzzzzzzzz says:

      It is delayed thanks to California emissions regulations that require battery state monitoring that current Outlander PHEV batteries do not have and it takes time to do it just for California.

  6. Turbofroggy says:

    Hmm, I wonder how many of them are never plugged in? I am sure many are purchased to bypass congestion charges and just run on gas all the time. Similar behavior in California with plug in prius and Energi drivers to get into the carpool lanes.

    1. MaartenV says:

      The Netherlands are the second market after Japan with 25% of total sales. The outlander is build and used as an electric car with range extender. The hybrids bought for tax evasion are mostly with a much smaller battery and electromotor.

      But in the Netherlands hybrids are considered a transitional technology that has fulfilled its role. The incentives are only over for these cars.

  7. Rick James says:

    No third row on this thing is a deal breaker, not worth it for me. T&C should be wildly more successful than this for the PHEV market at sub 50k price range.

  8. Barcardi says:

    With their set goals, I do not see this as compelling and therefore do not think it will sell…

    Right here on insideevs, it was stated that engineers are trying to get the thing to 20 miles of EPA range…This was before they got caught fudging the #s so it’ll most likely be further scrutiny…Has a 0-60 of 11 seconds, no third row and will be fairly pricey…

  9. vdiv says:

    Congrats to Mitsu!

  10. Scott says:

    Why can’t we get a PHEV in this segment already! What was the range on the Rav4 EV? The tech is laying on the shelf, just put it together already.

  11. ModernMarvelFan says:

    Well, by the time this thing arrives, the Pacifica PHEV will eat its lunch. It will have more EV range, more seating capacity, better performance and more features.

    The only thing this thing has left is AWD which Pacifica won’t have.

    But at that point, it will be behind again just as I-MiEV was.

    1. James says:

      If Pacifica PHEV is to “eat it’s lunch” though, FCA and CEO Marchionne have to green light sales beyond compliance car status. This is definitely not a done deal since Mr. Marchionne says:

      A) “Embracing only electric vehicles would be like masochism in the extreme”

      http://insideevs.com/fiat-chrysler-ceo-marchionne-says-embracing-only-electric-vehicles-would-be-like-masochism-in-the-extreme/

      B) “Don’t buy our Fiat 500E”

      http://finance.yahoo.com/news/fiat-chrysler-ceo-please-dont-buy-fiat-500e-202018995–sector.html

      – And my favorite:

      “When I drove a Model S, I had to turn up the radio to fill the void where there was no noise” (!!!?)

      http://insideevs.com/sergio-marchionne/

      Don’t be surprised if Pacifica PHEV is dribbled out in handfuls in C.A.R.B. states, and not promoted beyond a green halo.

  12. Phr≡d says:

    “perhaps even more successful than Mitsubishi had ever thought it would be”

    qualifies for the understatement of this reading.. imagine that boardroom reaction with a not appreciably successful company OR their SUV:

    “Let’s put a Battery in it” (four-five years ago).

    trust Someone got a promotion

  13. abc123 says:

    If the Outlander was in the hands of any other car manufacturer, it would have done a lot better.

    Mitsubishi is probably the least equipped manufacturer to be leading the charge for PHEV SUV. They don’t have the resources, they don’t have the manufacturing capacity, and they don’t have the suppliers that can keep up with demand.