Michigan Continues To Unimpress: Annual $75 Fee For EVs, $25 For Hybrids Coming Soon?

JAN 29 2015 BY JAY COLE 83

Hey Michiganders, Do You Enjoy Your High Registration Fees On EVs?  How About An Annual Fee To Go On Top?

Hey Michiganders, Do You Enjoy Your High Registration Fees On EVs? How About An Annual Fee To Go On Top?

While it is true that electric vehicles need to pay their fair share for road use at some point, we have long believed charging additional surcharges presently runs counter-intuitive to both federal and state incentives (and policies) currently centered around getting more people to plug-in.

After all, why annoy potential EV owners with nuisance fees when they are already been wooed to consider switching to the plug with large federal credits and incentives, HOV lane access at the state level, EVSE credits, etc?

It is estimated the direct incentives to promote purchasing plug-in vehicles in the US (both federally and at the state-level) for 2014 topped a billion dollars,  so why run a program counter-intuitive to that investment to return 1/13,000th of that money in Michigan or another state?

Knowing It Had No Shot At Surviving, Tesla Motors Didn't Even Attempt To Set Up Shop In Michigan

Knowing It Had No Shot At Surviving, Tesla Motors Didn’t Even Attempt To Set Up Shop In Michigan

Yet that is what Michigan is planning if a new “road funding ballot proposal” gets past statewide voting in May.

If the state, made famous for introducing specific legislation against Tesla Motors by its Governor (Rick Snyder) last October (HB5606), gets voter approval, a new law will be put in place that will see a $75 annual fee for EV owners AND a $25 fee for most hybrids.

“They’re not using any fuel, but they’re using our roads. So it’s some sort of a user fee in that respect,” – Senate Majority Arlan Meekhof.

However, Michigan EV owners are already paying considerably higher registration fees based on the higher net cost of the vehicles.  The Ecology Center of Ann Arbor said last year that an EVs already can generate more lifetime revenue for the state than conventional vehicles – although they also noted some of that revenue comes from the state sales tax, which heads to schools and the cities themselves over the road tax fund.

MLive notes that:

“A 2012 Ford Focus Electric hatchback cost almost twice as much as its gas-powered equivalent, resulting in about $700 extra in sales tax at purchase. An average owner could save about $1,011 in state gas taxes over 165,000 miles but pay about $842 in extra registration fees over 11 years, according to the analysis.”

Charles Griffith of the Ecology Center  told MLive that:

“All the Electric vehicle drivers I know, and also hybrid vehicle drivers, don’t have a problem with the idea of paying their fair share of road taxes. No one is in denial that they’re using the roads just like everyone else, but there is a problem when it feels like they’re being penalized, and I think that’s really part of the situation we have right now.”

Currently Nebraska, Colorado, Washington, North Carolina and Virginia have state-level fees for plug-in vehicle owners.

Ironically, the same bill would see Michigan’s state tax raised overall from 6% to 7%, but not applied to the cost of fuelWay to go Michigan!

MLive, hat tip to Jeff B!

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83 Comments on "Michigan Continues To Unimpress: Annual $75 Fee For EVs, $25 For Hybrids Coming Soon?"

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Yeah. I think it is insane to offer incentives to buy an EV, but then charge people a fee for driving one at the same time.

Whatever. I’d rather pay the fee than listen to whiny right-wingers complain about EV drivers not paying their fair share.

They will whine anyway, so might as well fight it.

Now is the time to embrace our brothers from the right and be thankful that there are those wishing to ensure that everyone pays their fair share. I think the ev drivers of Michigan should welcome the opportunity to pay their road tax and then ask really nicely for those in their petrol vehicles to kindly reimburse them for the cost of cleaning the filth off their buildings, the extra incubators required in their hospitals for the premature babies and then there’s the small mater of compensating Canada for lost revenues due to acid rain.

I’ve never been to Michigan but I am willing to bet the cost of road repairs is really insignificant compared to road pollution.

…And then there is the small matter of $3T spent on wars in the middle east. Even if you assume only 33% of those wars were do to oil (I think it’s 90%), that is still one trillion dollars spent on trying to keep gasoline cheap and available. That is almost enough to buy every single family in the US a Nissan LEAF.

The $75 dollar fee for EV is reasonable, but exempting fuel from the sales tax increase is most definately NOT reasonable. It is the hight of stupidity.

Any why tax hybrids? They also pay the fuel taxes just like other ICE cars. I could see the $25 fee for PLUG-IN hybrids only.

GSP

Washington requires an annual $100 EV fee. This is reasonable and I gladly it. Just because some one is doing the right thing by driving an EV doesn’t mean they should support maintenance of the roads.

And, $75 or $100 is a very small bump when you are buying a car that costs, at least in $30K range (and usually a lot more). The impact won’t be measurable. How many people would say “oh, 75 bucks! no way I’m buying one of those”???

well, that was articulate. “…doesn’t mean the should not have to support…”

We knew what you meant, STG. 🙂

Gas tax tends to be between $0.30 to $0.50 per gallon depending upon the state, so when you do the math, paying $75 instead to help maintain the roads is a bargain after all.

“And, $75 or $100 is a very small bump ….. The impact won’t be measurable. How many people would say “oh, 75 bucks! no way I’m buying one of those”???”
—————-

It’s called nickle & diming. And it’s counter-effective to getting more people into plug-ins, so why do it? You described it as a non-measurable, very small bump. So what is collecting it going to do for actually repairing roads? Instead, it sends a big negative message towards EVs. “Hey, buy an EV and we’ll penalize you”. I’ll pay my fair share for road use. Make all roads toll roads. But if there’s a major snafu regarding gasoline/oil, or insurance rates are higher due to car fires, or ANYTHING gasoline rated, than everyone that uses gasoline as their primary motive fuel should be paying for it. Not me.

People would rather be nickel-and-dimed every week at the pump than have to pay a lump sum once a year. If it’s a reasonable fee for ev drivers, or cng drivers, then eliminate the gas tax and diesel tax per gallon and apply this universal road use fee to everyone.

That would screw over ppl that only drive 5000 miles/year.

And semi trucks do a lot more damage than $75/truck.

I’ve suggested the same use fee before, except mileage based. Say a penny per mile when you renew your license. Enforced by law with a fine if you lie.

Then people shoot holes in it and say nothing can change unless the new system is impossibly perfect.

Here in Virginia we pay something like $60 a year for an EV to support the roads. They were forcing hybrid car owners to pay also but I think they repealed that. I have no problem with paying my share.

North Carolina charges $100.00 EV fee so $75.00 doesn’t sound too bad.

NC only has a 4.75% sales tax vs. 6% in Michigan (now possibly 7%).

If Michigan is going to add that extra tax, they should add an air quality tax to ICE vehicles. Pollution from ICE vehicles kills more people every year than the number of people who die in accidents. This drives up the cost of healthcare.

Eventually all states will do this. Governments will need something to offset losses to the highway funds as gas use declines.

Just to be clear (may not have been in the article), we 100% think EVs should pay their fair share of road tax, perhaps even a little more given the average demographic/high wear profile of the cars themselves.

We just don’t feel that the time to start implementing the program is now.

The revenue generated is very marginal due to the low number of pure EVs on the road (less than a thousand in Michigan), and it is direct opposition of the huge incentive programs encouraging ownership.

Perhaps some kind of hardship petition allowance to the federal government could be looked at for states who honestly feel hard done by..but again, the revenue generate at time of purchase is usually double that of a comparable ICE.

So, not saying “no fees never” here, but perhaps it would be better to hold off on the fees for a couple years until the US hits its “million mark” and the other programs expire. Another alternative would be to make it $100 in 2018 rather than $75 today to compensate for the gap, this would be net positive to the state within a year or two of the change.

If you support fiscal responsibility, you must support road-use fees for EVs now.

Nope.

(shortest reply for me ever, lol)

If we are supposed to be fiscally responsible, then why raise taxes for everything EXCEPT gasoline?

Did big oil leak its way into Michigan politics??

Sounds good to me. Of course we should simply change to a straight mileage tax, irresepective of propulsion. Of course, EVs wouldn’t get the almost free ride that they are currently enjoying. But getting mad at a proposed flat road use fee for EVs when EVs have been escaping paying for road use is not fiscally responsible.

Why should we do a straight mileage tax? An 18 wheeler will do more road damage than a Corolla.

The gas tax is essentially a mileage tax that also factors in the amount of damage done to the road by the vehicle.

To extend this to EV’s, if they were separately metered, the electricity could be taxed in a very similar manner.

The 18 wheeler argument is already addressed in their registration fees and apportionment fees.

Kdawg asked:

“Did big oil leak its way into Michigan politics??”

That’s not a leak, it’s a gusher.

Michigan has a GOP governor; the House has 63 GOP and Democrats; the Senate has 27 GOP and 11 Democrats.

In other words, State politics are entirely run by Republicans. Hopefully that answers your question.

The Federal government is trying to push “green energy” and EVs; States run by Republicans are fighting back. Note that, for example, in Oklahoma, you have to pay an annual fine if you get power from solar or wind!

Haha, couldn’t agree more Jay (on all points)

I agree that a fee should be paid, but I also think that the fee and tax structure is also off.

We know for a fact that larger, heavier cars do the most damage to the roads. So why stop at just the EVs and have your registration be based upon the tonnage of your vehicle, where the costs are curved up, as the tonnage goes up.

(A small moped has nearly 0 chance of damaging the road while a Hummer causes lots of damage is the reasoning behind it.)

This would be more appropriate, IMO. Drive a large car that puts more stress on the road, then pay more for your registration due to the weight of it.

Now wouldn’t _that_ be even more fiscally responsible?

According to this 2009 report, registration fees pay for 45.1% of road maintenance in Michigan, while fuel tax (gas + diesel) pays for 49.9%

http://www.micountyroads.org/PDF/Twp_funding.pdf

Cars of all sizes are basically irrelevant. Trucks do by far the most damage, not only to the surface, but to structures such as bridges as well. And those structures are costlier to begin with, so they can support trucks.

Trucks are not taxed anywhere near proportionately to the wear they cause. In effect, trucking is subsidized by the rest of us.

+2

Correct on all points.

In my opinion this is generally why the gas tax works well. It is more expensive for larger vehicles.

How do EV fees compare to fees for bio-fuels, CNG, hydrogen, propane, and other alternate fuels? All for fairness, just electric energy tends to be classified as an alt. fuel, but these fees seem to only apply to electric drivetrains.

Many jurisdictions have historically leaved fees and taxes on residential utility customers to fund major infrastructure projects and services. eg: Ashland funds police, fire and road maintance from electric utility fees.
http://www.ashland.or.us/Page.asp?NavID=37
Seems in some regions EV owners will be paying twice for some services.

BTW:
What about EV drivers from out-of-state using the roads in the state?

Maybe an alternative fee should be a carbon tax that all vehicles pay? Enter the state, report your odometer reading, or pickup a fob. On leaving the state, pay for distance traveled.

Seems like more thought needs to go into how road maintenance is funded in general, particularly ensuring funding is indexed to inflation.

I admit I have to pay my fair shair of taxes to support roads, but I don’t like a hight flat fee. ICE drivers pay taxes proportional to how much gas they purchase which tracks how many miles they drive, and hence how much “wear and tear” they put on roads. I support the idea of paying per annual mileage. The only fair way to do it is to make that apply to all drivers. Of course that means the hassle of of getting an inspection and another layer of beurocracy. Or they could just get rid of the gas tax and raise everybody’s yearly registration in proportion to weight of the vehicle.

I agree that the gas tax will become obsolete as a means of maintaining the nation’s highway system. A user fee is best, but it should include miles driven in addition to the weight of the vehicle.

Gross vehicle weight is already captured in registration fees and in case of commercial vehicles, apportionment.

Pure mileage fees, that cannot be diverted, is the real solution

Marshal G said:

“I support the idea of paying per annual mileage.”

I agree, the road use tax should be based on an annual odometer reading.

But as noted above, heavy trucks should pay a much higher road use fee than they do, because almost all vehicle damage to roads is done by heavy trucks. I hadn’t even thought about the point that bridges must be built stronger to support those trucks, too.

I’m ambivalent about whether or not there -currently- should be road use taxes imposed on EVs which are not imposed on gas guzzlers, but it does seem counterproductive to give with one hand (the Federal tax rebate for EVs) and take it away with the other. So I can see the argument that it’s premature to start that, and that it should wait at least until the Federal tax rebate goes away.

But more realistically, it’s almost impossible to convince a State to voluntarily give up a source of revenue, once it’s started.

” agree, the road use tax should be based on an annual odometer reading.

But as noted above, heavy trucks should pay a much higher road use fee than they do”

Then what you’re describing is essentially the gas tax. Heavy trucks pay more via lower MPG. We just need to figure out a way to extend that same structure to EV’s and other alt fuel vehicles.

How about making Gas car owners pay carbon tax.

That makes way more sense!

+1 for the health care comment. Perfect example of politicians not looking at the big picture. Too busy with being tickled to death by their self proclaimed importance.

+1 for the carbon tax too.

If states really want to fix the road funds, adding a penny or two to the gas tax is far more effective.

If there ever was a year where passing that increase would be possible, this would be it with the recent drop in gas prices.

+10

Michigan sales taxes on fuel does not go towards road maintenance (as of 2009.

http://www.micountyroads.org/PDF/Twp_funding.pdf

I only drive ~6000 miles per year in my EV. This annual fee starts to be a very large. Driving my Prius in Michigan for 6000 miles would cost me ~$27 in ‘gas tax’ (there is more sales tax on gas too, but I’m counting ~$0.20/gal of gas tax). Driving my Leaf would cost almost 3 times as much!

sorry – forgot the $25 hybrid penalty in my assessment. but the math looks like they’re trying to match 12000miles/year in a 32mpg car.

So does the Volt could as an EV or hybrid?

Both, so we get to pay $100

🙂

Rather than encourage people to drive cars that don’t pollute they penalize them. What backwards thinking.

At this point in time there should not be any extra fees associated with non polluting cars. In fact, there should an incentive to drive something that does not pollute. We are already paying a much higher cost to buy a plug-in car, so why punish us more by adding an extra cost to the car. It is not the amount. It is the principal.

Once there are a statistically significant amount of EVs on the road then incentives will no longer be needed and they can start charging extra, but until then there should be no additional fees.

I’ll be getting my LEAF and my Crown Victoria tags. It’s funny to see how much the LEAF costs to register, since the government calculates the fee based on the MSRP of the vehicle (pre tax credit). So I’m basically paying fees for a $35,000+ car.

My state is pissing me off more & more.

“Ironically, the same bill would see Michigan’s state tax raised overall from 6% to 7%, but not applied to the cost of fuel”

Then they better not raise the sales tax on electricity either!

I think a flat rate is wrong as well. Most BEV drivers do not put on as many miles as gas drivers, so how are they coming up with their figure?

This has been discussed before, but why not have a yearly odometer inspection for all cars/motorcycles and you pay for the miles you put on. Now you may get screwed if you drive a lot in other states and fill up on their gas.

The other option is to make all major roads toll roads with cameras. You get a bill at the end of the month for how much you used the roads.

How about charging a yearly fee of $75 to all the homes who don’t have a plug-in vehicle because they aren’t paying their fair share to keep the grid up & running?

Basically no-one is paying their fair share right now. Roads are crumbling, bridges falling down. The gas tax hasn’t been raised in decades (federal). Until that is done, I don’t see why EV owners should have to carry everyone else.

I beg to differ. It’s not that we aren’t paying our fair share. It’s due to typical government mismanagement. Michigan charges 41.39 cents per gallon for gas tax. That makes this state number 6 in gas taxes in the country. EV owners also pay 4% sales tax on electricity. Nobody is paying their fair share? They are getting raped! Registration is anywhere from $33 to $148 (my LEAF was $148 when I got it). Michigan is ranked tenth in the number of registered motor vehicles in the US, so we have plenty of cars paying registration fees. Not paying our fair share? On top of that, we have a 6% sales tax on vehicles. Michigan collected almost $2100 when I got my LEAF. Not paying our fair share? And lets not get into the fact that Michigan manufactures quite a few vehicles and auto parts. That’s all big business taxes in the pockets of government, not to mention income tax from all those auto workers. The amount of money collected by the state from motor vehicles is outrageous, and the condition of the roads is nothing short of insulting to those of us who already pay MORE than our fair… Read more »

“I beg to differ. It’s not that we aren’t paying our fair share. It’s due to typical government mismanagement.”

That broad generalization is easy to state, but with respect to the gas tax, it is hard to justify.

60% inflation increase since the gas tax was last raised. That has nothing to do with government waste, and it should be raised.

The government should also become more efficient in all practices, but that is a separate issue from the gas tax increase that is needed.

How about actually trying to clean up the existing vehicles on the road that are emitting far more emissions than they did when new. If they introduced an annual SMOG test or vehicle safety check on all vehicles, they would recuperate far more money for road maintenance than this proposed tax will generate.
The other benefit would be the removal of all cars that do not meet SMOG standards from the road, forcing the population to actually replace some of the clunkers currently being driven into the ground.
I am originally from the UK where everybody has to pay a road fund license. It is based on the CO2 emissions of the vehicle you are driving. Good news, electric vehicles do not need to pay for a road fund license.

Many good points in the comments. For one I would say that ev owners are not paying tax on the fuel they consume is not true. Look at your electric bill, there is tax added to that. Not commiserate with the gas tax, but a tax on the fuel, electricity, you use to power your vehicle. A set fee is also not equitable when compared with a gas tax. So if you drive more in you ice you pay more gas tax which seems fair, however if you drive less in your ev you still pay the same amount across the board independent of how much you drive.
Additionally ice’s are more damaging to the roads and the environment, as mentioned by a number of people.

The gas tax should be eliminated.

Road taxes should be paid annually, and calculated as follows:

Tax = GVWR x miles driven

The miles driven is easily determined through DOT records.

Only problem with that is if you live on a border city. So if say 2/3 of your driving in in your neighboring state, who charges a gas tax and you pay their gas tax when you fill up there (because that’s how it works out), then you also have to pay the yearly fee in your own state. Also, people in the neighboring state will all fill up in your state and not contribute money to their state’s roads.

I think the most effective way to do it is charge a toll to drive on the road. The road doesn’t care what state you are from, and the roads that get used more generate more money, and those roads would get more of the $ for repair. The toll could be based on vehicle weight even since the plate is registered to a type of vehicle which the weight is known.

Almost any solution short of detailed GPS tracking of each vehicle will fall short in some contrived situation. In the gas tax case, consider residents who live near a state border and habitually buy their gas in a neighboring state with lower fuel prices, but do their driving in their home state.

A miles-driven fee would have the merits of being easy to compute, fuel- and fuel-economy-neutral, and more “fair” (or at least less unfair).

Totally agree, and this is one of my hot buttons (living in VA, and paying $50/year for a hybrid (non-plugin)) – Toll roads, GPS, etc. are all complex, have privacy implications – Just do the calc on total mileage for a car per year, due during inspections, or when the car is sold. I agree is should be mileage X “some factor” and the factor should include GVWR, but the “factor” is likely more complex based on #axles, tires, load capacity – basically a term, per vehicle, that estimates per tire load, and estimates “road damage” – Seems like some lab can easily calculate that.. So annual mileage x “road damage factor” (which is really driven by GVWR I would assume) As JohnAA says, this is simple and easy – It covers CNG, EVs, whatever, if it’s on a road, and is registered in the state, it pays. As for folks living on state borders, we have basically the same problem today, with states have different gas tax rates – In VA (where the gas tax is now 0% – We have some of the cheapest gas in the country) – VA made up for the shortfall, by increasing the… Read more »

Regardless of when they enact these new taxes, people will squawk. And the more EV owners there are when that happens, the more squawking there will be.

Missouri also has a $75.00 annual fee for all alternative fuel vehicles. Bio fuels, natural gas, electric.

I suppose MI could also take the queer view, as an auto-manufacturing state, that lost road taxes may be lost to vehicles which are predominantly not made in state, either. The Volt being an exception. So, maybe they should double it!

But then again, Gov. McDonnell did this in VA, and now he’s headed to the big house.

Tell Snyder its bad karma.

Carbon tax…

Not mentioned in the story is the fact that the proposal has the proverbial snowball’s chance in hell of passing when it comes up for a vote in May. This is a little bit of a pity for those of us who drive cars here, because this horrible botch of a ballot proposal is our only hope of getting any road funding at all this year, because our legislators apparently can’t be bothered to do their jobs. Other points: The proposed tax increase from 6% to 7% is the sales tax, not the state income tax. So it’s even worse than it sounds. Michigan (so I hear) has the highest truck weight limits in the country. (Also close to the worst roads.) The proposal doesn’t just levy a fee on EVs and other plug-ins. It also levies a fee on non-plug-in hybrids. It’s just CRAZY to do that as far as I can tell, since hybrids drink gas just like any other conventional car. They just happen to have some batteries stuck in the drivetrain. With respect to such vehicles, the quote from Arlan Meekhof (“They’re not using any fuel, but they’re using our roads”) is a baldfaced lie, but… Read more »

Come to VA, we’re basically living the “nightmare” you described(fees for non-plugin hybrids, increased sales taxes).

This all passed in VA, so it’s possible to pass in other states, you too, can be living the dream…

Come on. they increased sales taxes and dropped gas taxes to trick the Virginia public into thinking they were lowering taxes. Everybody was smiling when they told us gas prices were going down 3 cents a gallon. They went from a fixed cents per gallon to a % of cost tax. Guess with dropping gas prices we can expect another hike in sales taxes to cover to loss.

Gah. I feel your pain.

I do think the likelihood of any tax increase, much less this one, passing in a special election in the current political climate is vanishingly small. The right will hate it because taxes. The left will hate it because it’s regressive. Besides, nobody will bother to go to the polls.

Our legislature might yet inflict something like this on us, but they’d have to grow a pair and vote for a tax increase instead of pushing it to the voters.

The key idea here is that the population of EVs is small and gas burners is high. The vast majority of voters owns gassers and will vote for this tax because it does NOT impact them.

I think you’d be right if the EV tax were the major issue on the ballot. In fact, it’s barely a footnote. The major issue will be the sales tax increase, which will likely go over like a lead balloon with the likely voters in this election.

In case it wasn’t obvious, it’s an all-up or all-down bundle. The politics of it are that Michigan urgently needs billions to fix our roads but our legislature are terrified of the idea of raising taxes. They can’t make the money appear from thin air by “working smarter”, “squeezing out inefficiency” or similar political bromides, they don’t have the guts to vote for a tax increase, but the public wants the roads fixed. So they’ve created this botch of a bundle of half-measures (the package still doesn’t fund the roads to the minimum level MDOT says is needed) that combines a sales tax hike with a whole bunch of other goodies (for example, school funding) and fees, including the Hybrid/EV fee the article is talking about. There are so many bills harnessed together in this one proposal that it’s hard for Joe voter (or, I’ll bet you good money, Joe legislator) to figure out what a “yes” vote would really be approving. Anyway, I think the marquee issue will the sales tax hike and the narrative that brings the package down will be “taxes bad”. And even people who understand the need to raise taxes may well vote against it… Read more »

You should not increase the tax on fuel because that is punishing tax payers… is hypocritical, ev owners pay higher purchase tax than other car owners and get less range per fill up.

A Tesla pays $75 annual fee and might travel 24,000+ miles in a year and a i-miev pays $75 annual fee and travels 3,000 miles in a year. This is arbitrary punishment for those who drive electric and not a fair way to raise revenue for roads. A mileage based tax that everyone pays based on miles driven seems equitable and better representive of road use and wear.

But when 3/4’s of a BILLION dollars is spent by the fossil fuel industry to control what laws pass and are written, justice serves only the people writing the laws. Fossil fuel corporations are more people than any human so they get to write the laws.

This law is designed to be a type of minor penalty with little significance, except to affirm culturally and society wise the superior status gasoline vehicles have. That is far more critically its real importance.

Michigan, the state that says, “Burning tires produces clean energy!”

Will flex-fuel vehicles in Michigan also have to pay the $25 hybrid fee?

My other question was about GM BAS/mild hybrids – Do those count as hybrids and are taxed accordingly? What about more common auto stop/start systems – Are those hybrids. It’s a slippery slope.

Here is the relevant text of the law (2013 HB 4630):

As classified by the secretary of state, if the vehicle is of a brand or has been modified to be powered solely or predominately by electricity under normal average class operating conditions, the registration fee for that vehicle under
this section is increased by $75.

As classified by the secretary of state, if the vehicle is of a brand or has been modified to be partially powered,
but not predominately powered, by electricity under normal average class operating conditions, the registration fee for that vehicle under this section is increased by $25.

It leaves a bit of interpretation up to the Secretary of State, but it definitely does not apply to any alternative fuel other than electricity. I doubt it would apply to mild hybrids or auto start/stop either, as these aren’t propelled using an electric motor.

So the Michigan fees are strictly focus on a vehicle having an electric drivetrain. Nothing to do with paying a fair share of infrastructure costs.

By the electric propulsion, this means start/stop vehicles also included.

Without context, the electric propulsion could also apply to a number of other vehicles: trolleys, electric buses, and diesel-electric trains.

How do EV fees compare to fees for bio-fuels, CNG, hydrogen, propane, and other alternate fuels? All for fairness, just electric energy tends to be classified as an alt. fuel, but these fees seem to only apply to electric drivetrains.

Many jurisdictions have historically leaved fees and taxes on residential utility customers to fund major infrastructure projects and services. eg: Ashland funds police, fire and road maintance from electric utility fees.
http://www.ashland.or.us/Page.asp?NavID=37
Seems in some regions EV owners will be paying twice for some services.

BTW:
What about EV drivers from out-of-state using the roads in the state?

Maybe an alternative fee should be a carbon tax that all vehicles pay? Enter the state, report your odometer reading, or pickup a fob. On leaving the state, pay for distance traveled.

Seems like more thought needs to go into how road maintenance is funded in general, particularly ensuring funding is indexed to inflation.

How about a formula based upon miles driven in a year and weight of the vehicle?

Potentially, a state could eliminate their gas/diesel tax.

To discourage people from crossing the border for “cheaper fuel”, at state borders (bridges) a lower fee would be charged for in-state registered vehicles leaving the state, as opposed to out of state vehicles. There already is a precedent for this, in many areas EZPass tag-holders often get discounted rates.

Your thoughts?

That sounds beyond excellent and I would love to see this implemented!!! Its passage depends on if you, as a Michigan citizen, are as much a person to people like Fred Upton, as the automakers and oil producers. Chances are their opinion carries absolute weight. …your vote counts only if you agree with them.