Marques Brownlee Takes Us Inside The Lucid Air, In Spectacular Detail – Video

7 months ago by Steven Loveday 22

Lucid Motors premiered its super-luxurious Lucid Air as a true Tesla competitor this past December. Marque Brownlee, otherwise known as MKBHD, provides an exclusive and  in-depth a look as is out there of this upcoming gem.

Brownlee was fortunate to get an invite to Lucid’s Menlo Park headquarters for a private event, during which he got up close and personal with the Air.

Lucid Air

Inside the Lucid Air (via YT/Marque Brownlee)

While the Lucid Air is much like a Tesla Model S, this video shows how “above and beyond” the Air could be when it hits production.

The three brilliant displays – one of which is retractable, and the panoramic roof line, are just the beginning of the remarkable façade that is the Lucid Air.

It is definitely ultra-luxury, with a fighter-jet like cockpit, swanky wood trim, and flat, reclining rear bucket seats.

Editor’s Note:  It may just be a coincidence, but we could not help but notice that Marque also got a privileged look/first drive of Faraday Future’s FF91 launch car in January (sister brand/product to Faraday Future and its 1,000 hp, 130 kWh FF1, both funded in part by Chinese billionaire Jia Yeuting), and that he seems positive about all facets of both vehicles – in two very similar reports, even to the detriment of his own Tesla Model S P100D at times. 

The price of the Air is set to match its high class option set, from about $165,000 a pop when the first 255 “launch edition” cars are delivered.  The Air is reported to deliver 1,000 horsepowerwhich is actually less than it is capable of, commands a zero to 60 sprint in 2.5 seconds, and have about 400 miles of range via its 130 kWh battery pack.

Unfortunately, production plans are minimal, and we have to wait about two years for those first 255 Airs to arrive in 2019.

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22 responses to "Marques Brownlee Takes Us Inside The Lucid Air, In Spectacular Detail – Video"

  1. Joshua Burstyn says:

    The interior is a work of art. The outside looks… very modern but not particularly cohesive. I’m not sure it’s for me. I prefer our Model S’ style.

  2. ijonjack says:

    I DON’T LIKE IT AT ALL..NOT one BIT ,,THIS CAR MAKES LITTLE SENSE REGARDLESS OF PRICE. The one and only Good thing That I would like about this car would be the 400mile range if that were to be true..It’s Just too Much of everything for my liking and/or needs.

    1. WARREN says:

      YIKES! No need to hate so much.
      I think it’s wonderful to see nice choices and state of the art engineering going into the latest EV offerings.

      1. Terawatt says:

        Oh come on. Simply saying that he doesn’t like it, even AT ALL, surely doesn’t constitute “hating”.

        Personally I am indifferent to it and consider it completely irrelevant. It won’t do much harm, nor much good.

    2. bogdan says:

      Very stupid not to like it, just because it isn’t Tesla.
      This car is a wonderful piece of engineering.
      Something like the Rolce Royce of EVs.

  3. Four Electrics says:

    The reclining seats are genius. Perfect for an autonomous car.

    1. Anon says:

      But do they have L5 autonomy that actually works?

      1. ffbj says:

        Maybe by the time it gets made the will.

    2. Terawatt says:

      That is a very good point. I was just thinking that those seats are maybe viable in a car sold to rich people who have other cars as well, for whenever they might need a trunk, but utterly unacceptable for most cars. But of course autonomy totally changes the picture, because there’s no longer any need to own any particular car and even average Joes can in effect afford to “have” multiple cars.

      No doubt those back seats are great whenever you have no need for a big trunk! And that is of course most of the time.

  4. Dav8or says:

    It just occurred to me, what a sweet gig a small group of automotive designers must have! Going from luxury start up to luxury start up building their prototypes. Making show cars to one up the last guy. None of it has to be practical, production ready, or even a good idea. You just get to play. Some of it doesn’t even have to work, just that it will someday in the future.

    Pretty sweet job I bet and there seems to be no shortage of people with billions, willing to throw money at you in hopes of them becoming the next Tesla right now. When one start up goes belly up, move on to the next. Of course this job is dependent on a strong economy and lots of venture capital. I hope these folks are putting away in savings because we all know the bust is coming.

    1. Lmfao says:

      Aw what’s the matter sadsack? They didn’t offer you a job on a silver platter?

  5. georgeS says:

    Nice interior. Back seat so much nicer than Model S. Frunk is huge so you haven’t given up trunk space.

    I’d stick with a Model X though. No supercharger network for this Lucid plus I think it is Chinese funded so another reason to give Tesla the business instead.

    1. Terawatt says:

      You prefer South-African funded then. That’s fine 😀

      The frunk is big, but it’s not all about volume. Since it is basically a hole accessed from the top the space is a lot less practical to use than a regular trunk.

      But as was pointed out elsewhere in this thread, those seats are a great idea in an autonomous car. If we are just renting cars in a low-overhead, largely automated system, at lower cost than owning a car ourselves, there is much less need for most cars to cover all of our needs. And most of the time we have no use for a trunk, or at least not a big one.

      With car sharing the fleet can be composed to match the frequency of need. If a large trunk is needed only 5% of the time, but people all own their own car, then only those who have multiple cars can disregard luggage carrying capacity, and thus most cars will need at least decent abilities in the area. But with autonomous cars and effectively dirt-cheap rentals, only 5% of cars would need to have that ability.

      Thinking of the Air in context of autonomy makes me completely reconsider those seats. They make no sense if you own only one car, as they utterly cripple luggage capacity. But when you choose a car for each trip it is quite clear that for most of the trips I would actually want to trade off luggage capacity for cabin space and luxury.

      1. Koenigsegg says:

        This is America. Dont want no chinese products

  6. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    Good to see that Lucid has made a well-received prototype. I think it’s unfortunate that so many of these small startups are dismissed as mere wannabe Tesla competitors.

    Tesla started out by making a limited production, partially hand-assembled “supercar”. It was a successful attempt to get a foot in the door into the highly competitive, and capital intensive, business of making highway-capable automobiles. Instead of criticizing these small startups for following Tesla’s path, we should praise them for following the one recent EV startup which has been successful, instead of the more-or-less guaranteed path to failure that companies such as CODA and Th!nk tried.

    The one red flag I see here, and it’s a big one, is that Lucid is backed by the same guy behind Faraday Future, which had failure written all over it from the very start. Let’s hope that Lucid will avoid making the same mistakes that FF did. Judging only by articles posted to InsideEVs, it looks to me like they are avoiding those mistakes. So good luck to them. And…

    Go Lucid!

    1. Terawatt says:

      I think the comparison is wide of the mark. The Roadster was a strategic move and quite necessary to change the then-prevailing golf-cart conception most people had of electric cars (and rightly so, btw, since most EVs *were* rather like glorified golf carts back then).

      One may believe Tesla or not, but they have always been consistent about their mission and to me their actions make it plausible. They really seem to attempt to put transportation on a more sustainable footing. Whether they are motivated purely by profit opportunity or genuine care/concern for the well-being of humanity isn’t really relevant, although I like to think that they do care, or at least that Musk himself cares – even if I think he does so in no small part because he wants to see himself as the man who saved the world. 😀

      Lucid, in contrast, seems a lot more opportunistic. They appear to see a niche market for very luxurious cars with a green image, and it seems plausible to me that such a business could succeed. But its not a mission I can get excited about. Nothing Lucid has done or said or shown indicates to me that the company is likely to do anything to significantly change the trajectory of the EV revolution.

      Maybe I’m wrong. Perceptions must still differ a lot from my own, given that I read that most Americans are unaware that electric cars exist. Maybe a car like the Air can help in making more people aware and desireous of EVs – just like Ferrari previously made an awful lot of people who could never afford one desire many of its characteristics (though none as much as precisely its exclusivity – few things seem to make people happier than feeling they are better than others).

      In my book, Lucid appears to be simply a new entrant with a possibly viable product that will make no difference. They are irrelevant. Again, maybe I am wrong. But that’s how I feel.

  7. Huhu says:

    Lucid is backed by multiple sources including multiple Chinese sources, I think they’re on a firmer financial footing than FF which is primarily backed by Jia YueTing.

  8. Priusmaniac says:

    Trunk space in the back is really bad but I would really like to see the normal backseat version which doesn’t have that trunk problem.

  9. Terawatt says:

    I actually like the car and think it seems like Lucid, unlike Faraway Future, has actually managed to at least come up with an appealing vision.

    But for me, EVs are mainly about reducing the damage from transport to the environment. And in that context, Lucid is simply irrelevant. Even if there may be some market opportunity selling ultra-high-end EVs to the rich, there is just nothing in what Lucid is offering that suggests the company will ever be significant in terms of making any difference to the EV revolution.

    It is also difficult to understand how you can spend this sort of resources and plan to make only a tiny series of cars. Presumably there are plans to make much greater numbers of the car, perhaps in a somewhat less outlandish version, but it doesn’t seem like they are in a hurry to get there. Which is odd, considering how quickly the EV market will be moving in just three years.

  10. Fabian says:

    The interior looks great, but the exterior looks bland and not very sexy.

    The front trunk certainly makes up for the lack of storage space in the rear trunk, if only the front trunk fully locks, unlike the Tesla.

    Maybe I’m too old school but I can’t see myself just laying back in the REAR seat and just letting the car drive itself. I think I need to see five to ten years of accident-free self-driving before I would get into that situation. There’s just too many idiot drivers and uncontrollable situations on the road.