Map Shows Electric Car Hot Spots In California


Biggest Loser From CARB Changes Tesla - Biggest Winner Is Pretty Much Any Fuel Cell Vehicle

Tesla Model S at Superchargers

There is an interesting map with numbers of registered electric cars per capita in California based on a study done by the Center for Sustainable Energy.

As it turns out, EV density peaks in Santa Clara at an average of 7.38 per 1,000 people (total 13,745 EVs).

Marin is in second place with 5.64 (1,457), while San Mateo and Alameda are fighting for third spot with 4.87 (3,643) and 4.63 (7,311) respectively.


Category: General

Tags: ,

21 responses to "Map Shows Electric Car Hot Spots In California"
  1. viktor says:

    It would be more interesting to see a map of how big share the EVs have of total of cars in a special area. If an area have many EV cars but it’s normal to have 3 cars per household it’s not so impressive

    1. A better map would use zip code regions for finer details of PEV and population density.

      Using zip codes where vehicles are registered will also aid in comparisons to other census-based data sets.

      1. Gregory Lemieux says:

        I agree. I’ve been pleasantly surprised at the number of EVs that I see parked in my neighborhood. Especially since my zip code has a dearth of off-street parking that would allow people to charge at home. I’m willing to bet that many of the BEVs I see regularly parked on the street are second family cars that are charged publicly or at work. It’d be good to see if that correlates with a survey of charging habits by zip as well. It may just go to show that a BEV is totally possible even without a dedicated home EVSE.

  2. Khai L. says:

    Hmmmm, it doesn’t seem that we can really extrapolate penetration of the market size from this date. The per 1000 people is of ALL people (including children who can’t drive). Assuming an average american household size of ~3, a number of 333 would mean EVERY driver had an EV.

    Needs some correlating numbers – average number of cars per driver and number of drivers per population maybe?

    1. Khai L. says:

      date = data. 🙁

    2. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      California: 840 “light vehicles” per 1000 people. (2007 data; “light vehicles” means cars and light trucks. See source 1)

      USA: 826 per 1000 people (source 2)

      source 1:

      source 2:

  3. scottf200 says:

    Didn’t know if anyone would find a map of Tesla SuperChargers of that same area interesting.

  4. Aaron says:

    When I’m at the office in Santa Clara, you cannot wait at a traffic light during rush hour without seeing at least 5 LEAFs and one Tesla at the intersection. I’ve pretty much seen every kind of EV there, except for a Coda.

    1. Speculawyer says:

      I’ve even seen the Coda. And Think City, iMiEV, Smart ED, Focus Electric, Model X, Active Es, and other oddball EVs.

    2. ModernMarvelFan says:

      I have seen Coda twice in SF Bay Area.

      I also see Fisker Karma occasionally. The rare find these days is Ford Focus EV.

      Even the E-Golf and E-Rav4 and E-Fit and Soul EV aren’t that rare…

      I do admit that I haven’t seen a single FCEV yet… =)

      1. GRA says:

        You’ve got me beat – I’ve never seen, or at least never ID’ed a Coda in the wild, outside of the one I test drove a few years back. I think I’ve seen at least one of every other PEV (even an Accord PHEV!) on sale in the U.S. other than the Porsches, and I might have seen some of them but not recognized them.

        Frequency here in the east bay is LEAF/Volt/Pip vying for first, with the Model S and the 500e about 1/3rd as often, the Fusion Energi just behind them but coming up fast, followed by the C-Max Energi then everything else. Fits are probably the rarest that I see once a month or so with Sparks just ahead of them, and I’ve only ever seen one iMiEV in the wild.

        Oh, and there was a Highlander FCHV-ADV in the general neighborhood for at least a year, but they seem to have turned that one back in off lease (they still have their LEAF plus 3 ICEs; 2 CUV and one crew cab Toyota pickup). We’re scheduled to get an H2 fueling station in town this year, so I’ll be watching to see if they go for a Tucson or Mirai – it used to be about a 15 mile one-way freeway trip for the nearest H2 station, but that should drop to less than 3 miles, right at a freeway exit, when the station’s up.

  5. ffbj says:

    It’s around 1% for pure ev’s in Santa Clara county. Of course people could own multiple vehicles and choose to drive the ev.

  6. Foo says:

    So that’s why there are 100 electric vehicles in the parking lot where I work (near Santa Clara). 🙂

  7. Scott Franco, the greedy republican says:

    You would probably find if you correlated EVs with engineers in Santa Clara, the figures would be way higher.

  8. To me it would be interesting to see the same type of heat map for Georgia, aka the EV capital of the east coast.

  9. ModernMarvelFan says:

    This “EV” map includes all PEVs that includes Volt, Energi twins and Prius Plugins for the CVRP studies…

    Yes, SF Bay Area is a mecca for PEVs. You can’t drive more than 1 minute without seeing at least one of the following: Volt, Tesla, LEAF or Prius Plugin.

  10. Tim says:

    I live in Lafayette (Contra Costa) and I don’t believe those numbers for a second. The penetration is higher, for sure. If I take a 5 minute drive, I see no less than 10 Leafs, 8 Volts, 5 Model Ses, 3 i3s, and a Fiat 500e. And that’s before I get to Whole Foods.

  11. Karol says:

    Show me a map EV-driven vs ICE-driven miles

  12. Priusmaniac says:

    Even more interesting would be to divide the number of cars by the buyers revenue, that would directly give an indication of the motivation degree of the buyers. It would be a powerful marketing tool that would show where to push sales further and where sales are already peaking.

  13. Darkj says:

    I live in Walnut Creek, CA, in Contra Costa county. On my cul-de-sac of 11 homes, there are three plug-ins: a Tesla, e-Golf and my Ford Fusion Energi.