Lucid Motors Teams With Samsung SDI To Develop Next-Gen Lithium-Ion Battery Cells

10 months ago by Eric Loveday 7

Lucid Motors electric car "alpha" in camouflage

Lucid Motors electric car “alpha” in camouflage

Atieva, founded in 2007 in California, changed its name sometime ago to Lucid Motors in preparation for launching an electric car of its own design.

Samsung And Lucid Execs Playing With A Touchscreen

Samsung And Lucid Execs Playing With A Touchscreen

That car, a 300 to 400-mile BEV with up to 1,000 HP and a 130 kWh battery pack, will enter production in 2018 at the automaker’s facility in Arizona and gets shown off tomorrow (Wednesday, December 14th) – but in order to bring that car (dubbed “Alpha” for now) to market, Lucid will need a battery breakthrough.

In steps Samsung SDI…

Lucid Motors and Samsung SDI announced a joint partnership on next-generation lithium-ion cells. Specifics were not mentioned in the press release, but there are a few choice quotes which indicate that the focus is on cell longevity, energy density and safety:

“The battery life demonstrated by the new cell will be of tangible benefit to our customers, particularly companies with ride-sharing services operating around the clock.”

“Samsung SDI combined their in-house chemistry expertise with massive real-world datasets and state-of-the-art battery models provided by Lucid to develop a cell that is both energy dense and resistant to damage associated with fast-charging.”

Press release below:

Lucid and Samsung SDI Strategic Partnership

Samsung SDI and Lucid collaborate on next-gen lithium-ion cells

“The battery life demonstrated by the new cell will be of tangible benefit to our customers.”

Samsung SDI and Lucid Motors are pleased to announce a strategic partnership for battery cell supply. Samsung SDI will be a major supplier of lithium-ion cells for Lucid’s first vehicle, an executive sedan scheduled to begin production in late 2018.

Samsung SDI and Lucid have collaborated to develop next-generation cylindrical cells that are able to exceed current performance benchmarks in areas such as energy density, power, calendar life and safety. Significantly, this jointly developed cell achieves breakthrough tolerance to repeated fast charging.

“I have been very pleased with the results of the collaboration with Samsung SDI in developing a cell chemistry that meets our stringent standards,” said Albert Liu, PhD, Lucid’s Director of Battery Technology. “Samsung SDI combined their in-house chemistry expertise with massive real-world datasets and state-of-the-art battery models provided by Lucid to develop a cell that is both energy dense and resistant to damage associated with fast-charging.”

“The breakthrough battery life demonstrated by the new cell from Samsung SDI will be of tangible benefit to our customers, particularly companies with ride-sharing services operating around the clock,” said Peter Rawlinson, CTO of Lucid. “I look forward to continued collaboration with Samsung SDI.”

“As the leading manufacturer of lithium-ion cells in the world, we are excited to be increasing our participation in automotive applications,” said J.Y. Youn, Samsung SDI Vice President of Sales. “It is an honor to be working with Lucid to help push their vision forward.”

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7 responses to "Lucid Motors Teams With Samsung SDI To Develop Next-Gen Lithium-Ion Battery Cells"

  1. ModernMarvelFan says:

    They better…

    I am sure Lucid motor doesn’t want the same battery cells from the Galaxy Note 7.

    1. Priusmaniac says:

      OK they had one bad battery but that is the exception. As the saying goes “if you don’t get a few explosions now and then it means you aren’t pushing the envelope hard enough”. But I do concede they indeed better happen in the lab then out in the wild.

  2. Djoni says:

    Let them coming!

  3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    Faraday Future, the new Fisker, Inc., and now Lucid Motors…

    Apparently it’s now de rigueur that if you’re gonna create an EV startup, you have to claim that you’re partnering with some battery maker to make a “breakthrough” battery.

    *Sigh*

    Elon Musk said it best: “Talk is super cheap; the battery industry has to have more B.S. in it than any industry I’ve ever encountered. It’s insane.”

    And I don’t believe this company is likely to make a car which actually does have a 130 kWh battery pack, either. I’d be very glad to see them prove me wrong, but I think the chances of that are slim and none.

    1. Bone says:

      I don’t see why 130 kWh battery would be unlikely. It sure looks like there is plenty of room for battery in that design.

  4. Jake Brake says:

    They can fit 130kwh, its just going to be a massive battery pack, im guessing 700-800kg.

    Glad im not the only one thinkings its silly/arrogant that these start up companies co-invent some magic chemistry. It takes hundreds of engineers several years running DOEs to develop something new. At best high volume customers can make minor tweaks to cell construction and coating thickness. What customers do provide is use cases, validation plans, and tons of testing.

  5. Priusmaniac says:

    I am always very surprised at complains about battery mass when in the same time there is never any such complains about SUV or other behemoth vehicles. At least a large battery in a car is there for something useful while the SUV mass to drive to the grocery store is just there for no valid reason.
    If it takes more to get to 130 KWh and 400 miles, just let it be. No problem with that at all.