LG Chem To Double Workforce In Michigan – Invites For Job Fair On April 21

APR 17 2015 BY MARK KANE 26

2016 Chevrolet Volt Cutaway (click to enlarge)

2016 Chevrolet Volt Cutaway (click to enlarge)

LG Chem Michigan Inc. announced a job fair on  Tuesday, April 21 at 1 LG Way in Holland, Michigan.

The Korean lithium-ion cell manufacturer expects to double the size of its production workforce in 2015.

Doubling the size of the workforce indicates to us that battery production for EVs will increase. General Motors recently lowered the price of Spark EV and Cadillac ELR. Furthermore, with the new 2016 Chevrolet Volt in the pipeline, sales for GM’s trio of plug-in model should increase quickly.

“Due to increased volume and a new customer, LGCMI is adding production equipment and expects to employ several hundred people by the end of the year.  Globally, LG Chem has numerous automakers as clients for EV batteries including GM, Ford, Renault, Hyundai/Kia, Volvo, Audi and Daimler etc. The company’s push to build its workforce begins Tuesday, April 21 with an all-day job fair at the company’s facilities, located at 1 LG Way in Holland. The event will take place from 9:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. and is open to everyone seeking employment opportunities with the company.

Prospective candidates should plan to meet with members of LGCMI’s staff to learn more about opportunities available at this market-leading, advanced-technology manufacturing company.

Candidates should come prepared with a copy of a recent resume and may pre-apply online at lgchemjobs.com or at the job fair. Those interested in Operator positions should bring their WorkKeys certificate if they already have one, otherwise WorkKeys testing can be scheduled at the job fair.

Open positions include:

Technical Operator, starting at $13/hour (Production, QA, Shipping/Receiving)
Maintenance positions (Electrical and Mechanical)
Engineer positions in Production, QA & Facilities”

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26 Comments on "LG Chem To Double Workforce In Michigan – Invites For Job Fair On April 21"

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Thanks, Obama. The battery biz suffered a bit while initial sales were slower than anticipated, some companies collapse, and car companies played with fuel cell cars.

But plug-in car sales are picking up, we are getting more & more models, word is getting out on how good they are, there’s been a shake-out in the battery biz, fuel cell cars have pretty much been dropped by everyone except Toyota, and Tesla has smacked the entire autobiz across the face.

Plug-ins are here to stay.

Obama is a job creator. Now if we can only train coal industry workers to transition into battery industry.

The coal industry is run by right-wing nuts. They won’t see the solar and wind revolution till they’re in bankruptcy.

Oh, coal is already in bankruptcy.

This should be a lesson to the industry.
Shit all over Solar, and Wind for years.
Won’t get one red cent from a Democrat now.

Coal is Dying, the sooner the better.

Well, at least one rat has the sense to jump a sinking ship:

http://www.dnaindia.com/money/report-coal-india-gets-into-solar-power-1839903

World’s largest coal company is now a coal/solar company.

Great to see LG Chem ramping up battery supply, altho I question that all those batteries are designated for EVs. There are a lot of consumer products that use them, and those are increasing sales every year also.

The article says:

“Globally, LG Chem has numerous automakers as clients for EV batteries including GM, Ford, Renault, Hyundai/Kia, Volvo, Audi and Daimler etc.”

Yes, and unfortunately, that means all the EV makers who depend solely on LG Chem for their batteries will have to split the supply amongst them. Tesla’s plan to build out a battery Gigafactory exclusively for its own supply is looking better and better. Furthermore, if Tesla and LG Chem stick to announced plans, then both of them will have a “pie” of battery supply about the same size by 2020; but Tesla will get its pie all to itself.

So it still looks like Tesla is the only EV maker committed to making long-range EVs in large numbers.

The LG Chem distributed factories approach is just as valid as the captive Tesla single factory approach, and in fact this announcement shows the strength of having regional facilities that can rapidly respond to local demand.

Also you can’t compare directly since LG Chem only makes commodity cells for manufacturers that keep higher value pack assembly in house. The auto industry has perfected commodity outsourcing, so this does make sense from a supply chain perspective.

Tesla chose to keep cell manufacturing in house along with pack assembly, mainly because they use a completely different kind of cell which represented a higher risk for companies like Panasonic.

Yes, Tesla went big on a single scalable factory, but that decision in no way invalidates the cell outsourcing model nor does it imply a lack of commitment to EVs by other manufacturers.

All you say is right, but Lensman has a point too. I’ve said it before: there will be at least a 1.5 year gap in battery supply, as soon as the 150-200 mile EV appear in late 2016. Everyone with a high range BEV will be supply constrained to about 50k cars a year (plus sales of 80ish miles low range BEVs) – besides Tesla. And there will be more demand than that.

Tesla is not the only one. Don’t forget that Nissan made a $5B investment in the Leaf high volume production capability. GM and BMW are not that far behind Nissan with their investments.

GSP

“Yes, and unfortunately, that means all the EV makers who depend solely on LG Chem for their batteries will have to split the supply amongst them. ”

Lensman, I don’t know what your professional background is, but let me tell you that every car maker (or every major company for that matter) has a planning and logistics department that lies out supplies years ahead…and talks to their suppliers.

It’s not like car companies forgot to multiply EV demand and capacity considering all sorts or variables, including upcoming emissions regulation (which will increase demand for EVs and PHEVs in some jurisdictions).

If we take Nissan as a case study, it seems they’re doing a pretty poor job of planning things out. When it first started selling the Leaf, Nissan said it planned to start making a profit in the third year of selling the model. Unfortunately it didn’t sell well, partly because of battery supply problems. Admittedly that was partly due to the 2011 tsunami in Japan, but Nissan didn’t solve its battery supply bottleneck until it built two new battery supply factories, in Tennessee and the UK. And what’s going on now with Nissan? There’s a fierce internal debate over whether to merely cut back on internal production of batteries, in favor of buying cells from LG Chem, or shutter the factories altogether! So, looks like maker of the #1 international selling highway-capable plug-in EV isn’t doing so well at the planning and execution of ensuring its battery supply, now is it? As for the rest… well, far too many plug-in EVs on the market are mere compliance cars, not intended to be made in large numbers, so battery supply isn’t really an important consideration for the manufacturer. In investigative journalism, they have a saying: “Follow the money”. When it… Read more »

“Lensman, I don’t know what your professional background is, but…”

You’re new here? His background is throwing out blanket statements.

I wonder what they can get their $/kwh down to.

This is real news for the EV market… Much more than any 10 announcements of yet more *yawn* concept cars by Audi (or anyone else).

Agreed wavelet on both accounts. Big battery news and difficult to handle the multiple start-stops from Audi. Kinda like this. (If I don’t do it, kdawg will…)

I was skeptical of LG Chem in the early days. But it does appear that their batteries are holding up and they continue to make advances in energy density. At this point I think they may have the best battery on the market.

Can anyone rule out that only one battery maker will dominate, to the potential downfall of another? So far, so brutal.

Hardly. Cells in general are more like beige box PCs, not laptops, and even laptops are big enough business to support a thriving, competitive (>6 or 7 entrants) market.

Of course, some supplier can always try to differentiate their cells somehow. But OEMs so far have been wary of locking themselves in to one vendor, since Fisker (via A123) made themselves Exhibit A.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vendor_lock-in

Who is the new customer?

Anyone who didn’t commit to the other cell suppliers. Simply the threat of LG keeps its competitors honest, and most integrators have the sense not to do anything that would (at least in the long term) keep them from switching suppliers.

This includes Tesla, as LG makes 18650s, and Tesla could use that to scare Panasonic.

Hey Republicans, Obama is creating jobs.

George w bush is the father of the modern electric car. He pushed for and signed the Energy Security Act of 2007, the legislation that jumpstarted the electric car industry. The act passed with bipartisan support.
Obama sat in a Volt once.

Haaaaaaahahahahaha!

The president who turned the Partnership for a Next Generation Vehicle from Chrysler/Ford/GM into Chrysler/Ford/GM/ExxonMobil/BP/Shell/ConocoPhillips… and then cut that?

You’re done, Ziv.

Who pushed for and signed into law The Energy Security Act of 2007? When did work on the Volt and the Leaf start up in earnest? PNGV was for gassers not electrics. Diesels, Prodigy, Precept and the ESX-3 cancelled. The program W started led to the Volt, the Leaf, the FFEl, the Spark and helped Tesla build sales faster.
W threw out the garbage and signed into law the bill that has brought us electric cars at a price most of us can afford, not $100,000 (cost to produce) EV-1’s that have to be subsidized on leases in order for them to “sell” and not sit on the lots.

QCO said: “The LG Chem distributed factories approach is just as valid as the captive Tesla single factory approach, and in fact this announcement shows the strength of having regional facilities that can rapidly respond to local demand.” That certainly is yet to be proven. Many are saying that Tesla can’t achieve its goal of at least 30% cost savings, which means that if Tesla does do it, the other battery makers won’t be able to compete on cost… and they know it. Tesla is attempting to do for battery manufacturing what the Ford Motor Co. did for car manufacturing with its River Rouge Complex. “Also you can’t compare directly since LG Chem only makes commodity cells for manufacturers that keep higher value pack assembly in house. The auto industry has perfected commodity outsourcing, so this does make sense from a supply chain perspective.” Tesla’s original plan was to use commodity cells. In fact, it did just that for the Roadster. For the Model S, it contracted with Panasonic to make cells to its specification. But Tesla has been supply constrained because Panasonic has not been able to keep up with the demand; not even by re-opening mothballed factories. Tesla… Read more »