LG Chem Commissioned To Build 1 MWh Battery Energy Storage System For Southern Company & EPRI

SEP 26 2015 BY MARK KANE 21

Modular and scalable LG Chem battery racks provide robust, high-performance building blocks for the energy storage system in Cedartown, GA. Photo courtesy of Southern Company

Modular and scalable LG Chem battery racks provide robust, high-performance building blocks for the energy storage system in Cedartown, GA. Photo courtesy of Southern Company

LG Chem commissioned a 1 MW/1 MWh lithium-ion energy storage system, integrated with a 1 MW solar PV system in Cedartown, Georgia for Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).

The ESS is installed inside the service territory of Georgia Power, the largest subsidiary of Southern Company and will be used to: “evaluate the grid impacts of the BESS in support of multiple applications, such as load smoothing, peak shaving, and voltage support.”

Enclosure and power conversion equipment was supplied by ABB.

” LG Chem successfully executed the project in close collaboration with Southern Company, EPRI, and ABB, who supplied enclosure and power conversion equipment.

LG Chem’s role in the project includes supplying the batteries and power conversion equipment, battery installation, commissioning and operations and maintenance.

EPRI will assist with testing and analysis of data from the project to help Southern Company understand how well the BESS works to onboard and discharge energy from the solar farm, in conjunction with other technologies that are part of the project. “

Haresh Kamath, senior program manager at EPRI said:

“Energy storage is a technology that can enhance grid reliability and make it easier to integrate renewable energy sources. The learning and experiences gained throughout the course of the project are beneficial for moving forward an integrated grid in the U.S. and worldwide.”

Sunghoon Jang, senior vice president, Energy Solution, LG Chem commented:

“This project is strategically important to LG Chem due to the role EPRI plays in the utility industry, as well as the impact Southern Company has as one of the major energy companies in the U.S. The successful commissioning of this project is another example of LG Chem’s capability to collaborate in order to execute and deliver energy storage solutions for the market.”

Electrical energy is stored inside this building in Cedartown, GA, using commercially-available, field-deployed LG Chem batteries. Photo courtesy of Southern Company

Electrical energy is stored inside this building in Cedartown, GA, using commercially-available, field-deployed LG Chem batteries. Photo courtesy of Southern Company

Categories: General

Tags: ,

Leave a Reply

21 Comments on "LG Chem Commissioned To Build 1 MWh Battery Energy Storage System For Southern Company & EPRI"

newest oldest most voted

Boy they are really into this stuff down in Joe-ja.

They bot all those Nissan Leafs and now this.

Then add those new Gen 2 Nukes they have going in and they are quickly becoming the Nations global warming action center.

I think Proterra is down there also. Oh and GE makes wind turbines there too.

Georgia Power is actively trying to take revenue from the oil/transportation industry..

Smart business.

Proterra is based in South Carolina.

Batteries are useful to store energy for a day. Eventually, however, as we head toward 100% renewables, we will want to store solar energy in the summer for use in the winter. At that scale of energy storage, other technologies become much, much cheaper.

Which technologies are you thinking of?

Three possibilities come to my mind:

1) Pumped storage. Local topography may not be suitable.

2) Hydrogen. It works, but it is inefficient.

3) Compressed air storage. You need some way to heat the air as it is released. This is most often done with natural gas, which I consider unacceptable.

“You need some way to heat the air as it is released”

There is some R&D being done on this by companies such as Lightsail Energy, trying to trap and reuse the heat that is generated during compression.

Yes, although nuclear plants, which don’t need long term storage, look easier.

Three Electrics said:

“Batteries are useful to store energy for a day. Eventually, however, as we head toward 100% renewables, we will want to store solar energy in the summer for use in the winter. At that scale of energy storage, other technologies become much, much cheaper.”

Rather than try to store enough energy to last three solid months (or even the approx. 1/3 of that which you’d actually need), it would be much, much cheaper to simply build out 5x-10x the amount of solar panels as needed on a sunny summer day, so you can get sufficient solar power even on a cloudy winter day. Solar panels have gotten pretty cheap.

Of course, the space to install all that won’t be available in urban areas; it will have to be built out in “wilderness” areas where land is cheap, and carried by the grid to urban areas. Off-grid living will remain an unobtainable goal for most urban dwellers.

“Off-grid living will remain an unobtainable goal for most urban dwellers”

If grid electricity is clean and cheap, there is no need to be off-grid.

That’s not necessarily true. Whether to overbuild or build storage depends on the relative costs of solar and energy storage. I agree, however, that at if today’s exorbitant costly batteries were the only option, would likely be better to overbuild.

An interesting consequence of the overbuilding strategy is that, by definition, there will be tremendous amounts of surplus energy in the summer that can’t be stored and likely cannot be sold, or even given away. At that point it makes sense to deploy any cheap storage technology, no matter how inefficient (such as hydrogen from electrolysis), to capture at least some of this wasted energy.

Excess capacity won’t help solar power north of the Arctic circle in winter. Maybe you could use wind power.

What about all those roof that sit on everything we built.
House, market, plant, stadium….etc.
If you think about it, it might not be enough for everything, but it would reduce by that much the need to scavenge “wilderness”

Since the application only needs 1C (1 MW/1 MWh), I wonder if they cycle the batteries very deeply.

“LG Chem commissioned a 1 MW/1 MWh lithium-ion energy storage system, integrated with a 1 MW solar PV system in Cedartown, Georgia for Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI).” – Sounds like a Research Test, rather than a fully thought out operation optimum system.

I am thinking that with Averaging over 4 hours of sun a day, as Georgia being in Zone 4 (4.5 Hrs)- http://www.wholesalesolar.com/solar-information/sun-hours-us-map that they could practically go with up to 4 MWh of Battery Storage if they had a Tracking array, but since the above photo shows what look like fixed racks, maybe at least 2 – 2.5 MWh of storage would be ideal!

Anyway – we still are a long ways away from the full 100 miles by 100 miles of Nevada Desert covered in Solar – or it’s equivalent – as described at least 6 years ago – http://lasvegassun.com/news/2009/apr/05/power-desert/

What would be good to see – is the number of arrays and their square footage (Square Miles?) for each county in each State, of the USA – and the same for CANADA, and the EU, Asia, etc.!

More and more homes, companies, warehouses should start installing such battery storage units to buy and store power when its cheap at night and use it during day.

On top of these boxes, they can also install solar panels capture and store the energy.

Only if the arbitrage works out. A few places are hydro-based, and there isn’t much of a diurnal spread. Illinois is nuclear-heavy, which has atrocious dispatchability… but even there nuclear might not be the majority of the portfolio.

Curious Thought: Can Solar Panels – which operate more efficiently when they are cooler, but built and designed as an Energy Generating Hybrid, in that Water Cooling is incorporated into the panels – and the was heat is transferred to other uses where it is needed, and each Solar Panel in the Array has it’s own on Panel Battery Storage, right behind the Cooling Plate, such that each panel can store it’s own 4, 8, or even 24 hours of Production right there? If Solar Arrays of (for example) 1 MW had 1 MWh of Storage right on them, they could store just 1 hour of Peak Production, but if they had 4 MWh of storage – they could hold 4 hours of power for later delivery, and similarly with 8 MWh of storage capacity – for a full 8 hours worth of Peak energy Production! (Probably the Maximum useful energy stored right at the panel, with additional storage off the array itself!) Home Off Grid Systems often use 3-4 Energy Sources: Micro Hydro, Wind, Solar, and Either Diesel or Propane Generators for Battery Charging; Many Areas are starting to look at Run-of-river Electricity Generation, whereby they take the flow… Read more »

Tonight I read a news story about a hybrid solar panel that generates electricity and uses heat pipes like those found in laptops to pre-heat water. I remembered your above comment from a couple of days ago, and posted this belated response.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150925085759.htm

Meanwhile Georgia Power’s Vogtle is 14% over budget and 18 months behind schedule.
http://onlineathens.com/mobile/2015-06-03/georgia-power-says-vogtle-construction-contract-doesnt-keep-customer-costs-rising