Lexus Hybrids Take Jab At Electric Cars With New “Always Charged, Always Ready” Slogan

1 year ago by Eric Loveday 61

Note Lexus' New Slogan For Its Hybrids

Note Lexus’ New Slogan For Its Hybrids

Lexus continues to take cheap shots at plug-in electric car, despite being criticized for this approach on numerous occasions now.

Previous Lexus anti-EV ads include this one in which a charging station is shown with the words “Reserved for someone with four hours to kill” and this other one featuring a BMW i3 in which charge time is again the focus. Both of those ads were eventually removed by Lexus due to what we assume was lots of hate directed towards the luxury automaker, yet Lexus is back at it again and this time it’s on the automaker’s main hybrid website.

Lexus’ hybrid website now features the slogan “Always Charged. Always Ready,” a clear jab directed at electric cars. And in the print below you’ll notice another shot directed at plug-ins

“…all with nothing to plug in.”

lexus 2

Enough already Lexus. Yes, conventional hybrid sales are down and we get it that you’re trying to find a way to boost sales, but the future is with the plug-in, so instead of knocking electric cars, why not join the fray?

via Green Car Reports

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61 responses to "Lexus Hybrids Take Jab At Electric Cars With New “Always Charged, Always Ready” Slogan"

  1. Jakub Janovsky says:

    Getting a bit desperate, eh?

    1. JOMIJON says:

      Always Charged Always Ready., But still a Half Baked electric car that still uses etrol…… A FAKE EV…l m a o..

      1. mx says:

        Always polluting, Always dirty.
        Got it.

        1. Aaron says:

          I just Tweeted this:

          .@Lexus Always polluting, never exciting… Lexus Hybrids. Why can’t you make a compelling electric vehicle like @Tesla?

    2. turboro says:

      There IS300h with 223hp could not even beat MB C180 and BMW318 in acceleration, top speed and fuel consumption in comparison tests.

      They make themselves fully obsolate, if you consider that the other brand models are cheaper too.

      1. mr. M says:

        lol, worse fuel consumption and slower too. 😕

    3. Deven says:

      Dear Fuerher at Lexus still talking about “Final Victory”. Lol. Do they believe themselves, or are they just going to lead their customers and stock-holders into the abyss?

  2. SparkEV says:

    After waiting for Leaf in last 5 out of 5 DCFC sessions from 15 min to 1.25 hour wait, Lexus does have a point. Unless EV makers stop giving out free charging, EV will be hopelessly impractical except for local driving. If Toyota, etc. really wanted to kill EV, cheapest way would be to give out free charging.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      Or maybe a BEV should have a battery pack large enough that you don’t need to use a DCFC station more than a handful of times a year. A battery pack bigger than what the Leaf has.

      1. SparkEV says:

        With bigger battery, free chargers will take an hour or more (ie, Bolt), so average wait time will be worse. While times you need DCFC could be less, waiting much longer on DCFC will be just as bad, if not worse.

        The time you decide to go on a long trip is probably the same time everyone else wants to go. Those who get free probably didn’t charge at home, so they’ll have to charge at DCFC to take that long trip, even if it’s hours of wait. Or they’ll just abandon EV and buy “Lexus”.

        Any way you look at it, free charging is or will kill EV. I’m so glad and grateful Chevy is not giving out free charging. Hopefully VW won’t either.

        But without waiting, someone drove SparkEV for 1000 km in 16 hours. Long trips on even 82 miles range EV is certainly possible; just need to get rid of free charging.

        1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

          SparkEV said:

          “With bigger battery, free chargers will take an hour or more (ie, Bolt), so average wait time will be worse.”

          Am I mis-remembering, Sparky? I thought you had published one or more graphs showing that the charging taper on the Bolt is minimal, giving just as good or perhaps even a better overall charging rate for the Bolt than for the Model S.

          But that aside, I’m truly shocked to see you parroting the argument that “big battery packs are worse because it takes longer to fully charge them”. As has been quite properly pointed out, that is as ridiculous as claiming gasmobiles should have tiny gas tanks because that way you can fill them up faster!

          Larger battery packs give the driver more options, and nobody says that you have to charge a battery pack to 100%, or even 80%, every time you stop at a DCFC charger.

          “Any way you look at it, free charging is or will kill EV.”

          This is unnecessarily pessimistic. There are lots of free EV chargers around, and they aren’t slowing the EV revolution, let alone stopping it.

          Sure, PEV (Plug-in EV) drivers will be better off once there is a nationwide network (and in Europe, continent-wide) of competitively priced, for-profit EV fast charging stations. But there have to be enough PEVs on the road to create enough demand to support that, before it happens.

          As they say: “Crawl before you can walk; walk before you can run.” We’re still at the crawling stage of the EV revolution, struggling to stand and take those first few baby steps. At this stage, free EV fast chargers aren’t doing much to hold things back. In fact, one can argue that we should be glad to see reports of clogging at public EV chargers, because that means enough EVs are on the roads to be producing that much need for charging!

          Now, if we can just get EV advocates to stop advocating that apartment dwellers who can’t talk their landlord into installing a L2 charger at their parking space, should buy a PEV anyway, and depend on public EV chargers to charge on a daily basis… That is certainly counter-productive. People who can’t charge at home, or at least at work, shouldn’t buy a PEV. Period.

          1. SparkEV says:

            I never said big battery itself is bad (though it is to some degree). It’s the combination of free charging and slow charging big battery like Bolt (0.8C). If you’re at DCFC and there’s a Bolt plugged in with 45 minutes to go and another Bolt waiting, it could easily be 2 hours of waiting. Same situation with Leaf might be an hour or less. The Problem is, Bolt (hopefully) won’t get free charging so you won’t encounter many while chances are almost 100% that you’re waiting for Leaf.

            EV adoption would be possible even without free charging. Free charging is at best a ploy to push crappy EV that people wouldn’t normally buy, or at worst undermining EV adoption in general. Even without free charging, people will still buy Tesla P100DL, or Teslas in general. Same is true with SparkEV and Bolt.

            But would people clamor to buy so many Leaf that’s known for battery degradation without free charging? Doubtful. Instead of making better EV, Nissan has gone on destructive path by offering free charging, especially with EV with such awful charge taper.

            1. Tony Williams says:

              I can assure you that every Tesla P100D not only comes with “free” charging, it also comes with the fastest and most comprehensive charge network. In addition,mitmhasnthe option of an adaptor for the highest quantity DC charging protocol in the world, CHAdeMO.

              1. SparkEV says:

                Even without free charging, people will still want and buy Tesla. People who buy Tesla generally won’t want to waste time at their neighborhood DCFC when they can charge at home. But my point is more about Leaf and “affordable” EV getting free charge.

                Many people who buy Leaf don’t mind waiting at DCFC to get free. They also plug into DCFC every freaking time, whether the car has 50% or 90%; yes, I’ve waited for Leaf with 90% and 28 minutes left to charge.

                If your aim is to have EV only for rich people who value their time more than getting free charging from neighborhood DCFC, sure, free could “work”, though Musk sent out letter for DCFC abuse even for them. But for general public who think their time is worthless, free charging is a surefire way to kill EV.

          2. vdiv says:

            Blasphemy! They should buy an EV and either convince the landlord to install charging or move! 🙂

            1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

              And they should refuse any work offers if workplace parking doesn’t provide free charging for everybody!!!!

    2. Acevolt says:

      Thats the biggest problem with all EV’s except Tesla right now. Until the DCFC infrastructure grows, this will be a problem. I have made a lot of long distance trips and never had to wait for a Supercharger. The Superchargers in the cities are a different story, but those used for long distance trips have always been pretty much empty. The one in Barstow on the way to Vegas is busy, but I have never had to wait in the 8 times I have used that one.

      1. SparkEV says:

        DCFC waiting problem is not infrastructure problem, but free charging problem. Get rid of free charging, and it’ll get rid of 80% of the waiting. Not only will people not use it when not needed, but they’re more likely to unplug at appropriate charge level instead of taking full 30 minutes of free.

        1. Djoni says:

          Having experienced the same waiting at a free DCFC (BRCC in Québec), I tend to agree with you.
          The car was left unattended and was way over 80% charge but I did have to wait 15 more minutes before the guy went out to disconnect his car.
          I thing he believe that that the charger was his own, as I suspect he just hang around and get back to charge whenever he choose.
          Even a reasonable fee seems to civilized people.

    3. JustWilliamPDX says:

      Huh? I can’t comment personally because I never use public chargers. But claiming that free charging could “kill” EV sales strikes me as preposterous.

      1. SparkEV says:

        It’s simple econ of demand outstripping the supply. Suppose if every EV plug into public charger when they encounter it, which seem to be the case with many Leaf who get free charge. Given few hundred DCFC, that’s enough to support maybe few thousand EV when they optionally want to charge their car.

        But far worse problem is when you must charge the car as in long distance travel, or even just needing 10 minutes to get home from long weekend shopping. Chargers will be so clogged with “optional charging” that it could double, triple, 8 time, maybe even hours waiting for slow charging cars that already have 90%. This has been the case with me for past 5 out of 5 charging sessions.

        That’ll doom EV as local city car only, even with 200 miles range, and resulting low sales. In absolute sense, people still will buy EV like they did before public DCFC came to be (ie, way under 1% of sales). But that’s effectively killing EV. Companies aren’t going to develop cars that will forever have fraction of a percent of sales.

  3. David Murray says:

    This is more surprising now that Toyota is seemingly about to start marketing its PHEV hard. Of course, many of the same ads would still make sense for a PHEV since you could also claim that you don’t need to use public chargers.

    1. pjwood1 says:

      They are trying to segment the market. I think it goes something like “More car=Less battery”.

      I’m not into cars thst look like Japanese annimation, anyway.

  4. Goaterguy says:

    How about, “Always burning gas, Always polluting”?

    1. KevinZ says:

      …and in need of oil changes, tune ups, timing belts, etc, etc.

  5. Mr. B. says:

    “Always needing gas, always smelly.”

    And as a rejoinder to “… All with nothing to plug in”, “… except a filthy hose that dispenses toxic, carcinogenic liquid.”

  6. EV Only says:

    How about “Still polluting the air, sending our dollars overseas and funding terrorist states”

  7. John says:

    I’m never gonna buy a Lexus.

    1. EV Driver says:

      Me neither. With this attitude, the Lexus brand should be boycotted by all.

      1. JOMIJON says:

        I Boycott Lexus…

    2. turboro says:

      Me neither! In Europe they sell nothing, it is seen as a heartless, legacyless, impersonal cold brand.

      In addition they are too arrogant to adapt and offer e.g. a station wagon for european market

      If you don’t go for the big 3 (MB, BMW, Audi), you go for Tesla, Volvo, Jaguar or Maserati, but not Lexus.

      1. Will Davis says:

        or Alfa. They are popular here.

    3. Nemo says:

      I was never going to buy a Lexus anyway, but now I’m thinking about whether I ever want to buy a Toyota again. They’re pissing away all the good will they built with the Prius.

  8. Eco says:

    “Always Charged”? Sounds fraudulent!

    It’s kind of like saying “Always Full” and we all know that’s not true.

  9. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    “…all with nothing to plug in.”

    Or to put it another way:

    “We guarantee that these cars have 100% of their miles powered by gasoline, and not a single one by electricity alone.”

    Or:

    “Yeah, we put electric motors in these cars. But only to make the gas engines work more efficiently, not to actually give the cars the ability to be powered by clean energy.”

  10. Alaa says:

    Always charged but you always have to go to the gas station!

  11. Sublime says:

    “Always charged” to your credit card at the gas station.

    1. sven says:

      LOL! 😀

  12. michael says:

    Well I look at it a different way…at least they are promoting fuel efficiency even if it is all gas. I dare say nearly all of us on this site and now own a plugin started with a hybrid and probably a Prius. I loved my prius for 6 years and 150,000 miles. now I have had my Volt for 5 years and 115,000 miles and a have my Model 3 on reservation with $1,000. Look how long it took me to go to all battery! I’m still not there yet and I’m the craziest environmentalist tree-hugger I know. Get them in a cool hybrid first and they will evolve like we all did! Glad to see the ads from Lexus. And 99% of the population has no clue its a dig at plugins. who cares as long as we start people moving to alternative fuels. Jeez its less than 5% now. And everyone at work after 5 years of seeing my volt still doesn’t get it. They still ask stupid questions, you know, you get them too. So i say cheers to Lexus and Toyota, they’ll move to the market when more people demand plug ins, Wait and see.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      Sure, a more fuel-efficient car is better than a gas-guzzler which profligately wastes fuel. But then, you don’t need to make a car a HEV (Hybrid EV) to make it a fuel-efficient car.

      It’s not that (non-plug-in) HEVs are bad. It’s that most of them are not much if any better, in terms of pollution or energy efficiency and waste, than a typical 4-cylinder compact gasmobile.

      1. zzzzzzzzzz says:

        Pu-pu claimed:
        “It’s not that (non-plug-in) HEVs are bad. It’s that most of them are not much if any better, in terms of pollution or energy efficiency and waste, than a typical 4-cylinder compact gasmobile.”

        Sometimes you give impression that you did’t bought any cars at all for decades or some substance affects your reasoning.

        Most hybrids have much better mpg than comparable gas car. E.g Prius Eco 56 mpg vs 33 mpg Corolla, or 31 mpg Lexus GS450h vs 23 mpg Lexus GS350.
        http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/Find.do?action=sbs&id=38062&id=38156&id=38201&id=38206
        They have higher upfront cost which may result in higher or lower TCO, but oh well, new long range battery cars may have even higher upfront cost before subsidies, and manufacturing/PM/upstream NOx/sulfur pollution too. Not everybody shops just on TCO and logic though, some just shop on emotions and on autoloan payments they can be approved for given their debt-to-income ratio.

    2. Nope, never bought a Prius as (to me) it seemed a half-baked solution that over a total life cycle analysis was dubious (or only slightly better) whether it was an improvement on a pure gas car. Also hated the driving dynamics and the excessive weird-mobile interior (coming from someone who owns a Leaf!) I waited for a full EV before making the switch. Cheers.

    3. JustWilliamPDX says:

      I don’t have a problem with Toyota/Lexus developing and promoting more efficient vehicles. My issue is with their anti-EV, pro gas and hydrogen marketing.

  13. KevinZ says:

    I plug in my Leaf every night, and in the morning it’s always charged, unlike when I drive by the gas stations and there are Lexus hybrids lined up whenever gas prices drop.

  14. Get Real says:

    Well since Lexus LS sales are down 21% compared to Model S up (again) 32% I can see how they might be getting desperate!

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-10-12/tesla-dominates-u-s-luxury-sedan-sales

  15. Bob Nickson says:

    Dear Toyota,
    no plug, no sale.

  16. MarkT says:

    “Always Charged” (Via dirty coal, nuclear power & terror funded oil)

    1. Just_Chris says:

      no one is making petrol from nuclear power?

  17. Jeffrey Songster says:

    So… let’s look at their record of success. RAV4EV original… stopped production… RAV4EV with Tesla… corporate culture clash Toyota shows inflexibility in dealing with issues of integrating Tesla tech with Toyota. Cancel project. Next fixation is look… FUEL CELLS! Now with filling stations that cannot fill fully and not nearly enough of those white elephants about… it is time to diss the EVs to prop up their hybrid business which is beginning to flag with the 200 mile EVs on the way. I thought TOYOTA was a market leader… clearly not. LEXUS stale hybrids… fine cars… if that is all you want. Boring and near complete lack of innovation in favor of more Camrys. We love our Prius… but that is from the 2005 time frame… not even as much improvement as VOLT 1 to VOLT 2 to BOLT in 5 times the time. Sheesh! Very low energy… boring… weak… failing.

    1. mr. M says:

      PS: 12 to 6 years is only double the time, not 5 times.

      “not even as much improvement as VOLT 1 to VOLT 2 to BOLT in 5 times the time”

      Prius 2 (2005): About a 1 mile range and it’s supposed to switch out of EV around 25 mph.
      Prius Prime (2017): Around 22 miles of EV-range with 84 mph electric-only top speed.

      Within 12 years a increase of 2200 % in range and 380 % in speed.

      Compared to the Volt/Bolt combination:
      Volt 1 (2010): 35 electric miles and top speed of 100 mph
      Volt 2 : 53 electric miles, top speed of 100 mph
      Bolt (2016): 238 electric miles and top speed of 91 mph.

      Within 6 years GM decreased the top speed by 9 % (but started high) and increased range by 680 % (but started high).

      So in 12 more years, the Prius (Race Master) will be able to go 320 mph in EV mode and gets a EPA-range of 484 miles. The Jolt will get a EV top speed of 75 mph, but coming with a EPA range of 11.000 miles.

      Conclusion: You should most definitely wait for the Prius Race Master in 2028 if you are a speed junky, and i’m looking forward to someone driving the GM Jolt for 800 hours nonstop to prove the maximum range you can accieve is above 25.000 miles, making range discussions interesting again.

  18. Bacardi says:

    Except for the CT200, in which Lexus does not offer a non-hybrid version, all of their Hybrid offerings are thousands over their non-hybrid counterparts with often substantially less performance…Just weak/out of touch marketing basically a direct attack on Tesla…

  19. Paul says:

    Another reason not to buy a Lexus.

  20. Jason says:

    This advertising shows basic lack of understanding. EV owners/advocates know it is a joke, and it will not sway then at all. Normal Joe does not get it and will get a gas guzzler anyway. So a middle ground person might wonder what it means, and they might research and then find out about EV and possibly go that way.

    Anyone who understands this situation is already looking for a vehicle that has zero emissions. Not just a bit less emissions. Not a lot less emissions. Just simply zero emissions. PHEV and HEV are not zero emissions, and so for everyone this advertising is targeting it fails.
    As to comments about free charging killing the EV, this is short term problem. One of my auto companies offered free fuel for a year. Was it a problem? Not really, every petrol station has at least 4 pumps, and they are spaced about 1 mile apart, so that is a lot of pumps. I don’t really hear Tesla complaint about waiting for SC, I’m sure it happens, but they seem to have enough chargers in one place to reduce this problem. Really, once “normal” chargers are placed with 4 or more in the same location, and they are in closer proximity, this waiting for a charger will disappear as well.

    Or I can charge at home (costs me) or I can go to a charger for free, if still prefer convenience of charging at home. I know this for a fact as I charge at home every day and there is a free charger close by, but I really don’t want to go out of my way just for a free charge.
    Get a grip people, Lexus will see no benefit to these ads and EV will continue to gain ground even if Nissan sell low range Leaf with free charging.

    By the way, free charging is to the owner, Nissan no doubt still paying the charging company, so they still see a demand increase which, theoretically, should result in more charge infrastructure.

  21. Bill Howland says:

    Somewhat misleading advertisement – if comparing with any of the many PHEV products – since those are ALSO Always ready to go.

    If this is a direct attack at BEV’s such as Tesla, they may have a small point, and its just advertising to trumpet your strengths, even though its pretty meager in the case of Lexus.

    Myself, I like the fact I’m not all that dependent on gas stations, and if lines form at gas stations like what happened in the 70’s I really don’t have to worry about it since I can charge up plenty well enough at home.

  22. HVACman says:

    This ad doesn’t work when comparing a hybrid with a PHEV

    Bring back a variation of the old Volt ad:

    “charged when you want it, gassed up when you need it”

    Chevy Volt – Electric AND always ready

  23. Anon says:

    “Always at the Dealer. Always getting Repaired.”

  24. Rick Bronson says:

    Its gassed up and not charged up.

    Seems Lexus has discontinued the LS600h which is the top of the line Hybrid car priced at $120,000.

    For a much lower cost, we can buy a Tesla Model-S 100 DL which has 89 MPGe and also can seat 7 and has the title of World’s fastest car.

    Even if you don’t want to wait during charging, you have BMW 740e at a much lower $90,000 price tag which can also go 15 miles on electricity.

    Is Toyota really going to sell the Prius Prime in big # ?

    1. mr. M says:

      The Prius prime will catch 20-60 % of today Prius sales soon if Toyota can provide the numbers.

  25. zzzzzzzzzz says:

    Such articles give impression that Tesla fanboys are overly sensitive thin skin people freaking out because of some ad. “Always charged” – so what? Should you go hysterical now because your more expensive car takes some time to charge and it is sore thumb for you?

  26. Koenigsegg says:

    Lexsux

  27. bogdan says:

    I used to have respect for Lexus. But since Tesla, it’s all gone!