LA Teams With 30 Cities To Get Cheaper EVs For Fleets

Chevrolet Bolt

SEP 11 2018 BY STEVEN LOVEDAY 13

Many people are in the market for a new car and cities have the same issue with fleets. How can one push those to adopt EVs?

According to Wired, Los Angeles is upping its game to assure that EVs take precedence. While many new car shoppers may not see the benefits of EVs, the city can only hope that fleets understand, which may eventually motivate individual buyers. This is critical since LA operates some 11,ooo vehicles currently. The article explains:

Los Angeles operates about 11,000 vehicles and pieces of equipment, including shared company ‘pool’ cars, buses, street sweepers, and garbage trucks. (For comparison, that’s going on twice the size of UPS’ delivery fleet of 5,900 vehicles.) The city, long a leader in the war on smog, wants to switch as many of those vehicles as possible to electrics. It’s a great move for the planet, for Angeleno’s lungs, and for politicians who want to run on an environmentally friendly ticket.

This goal is difficult, however, since EVs cost more. But LA is working to alleviate that and involve many other cities in its efforts. According to the source article, an electric bus may cost some $300,000 more than a traditional bus. But still, LA officials are willing to do what it takes to assure EV adoption and clean air. Wired shared:

Los Angeles announced today it is teamed up with 30 US cities total to collectively work for better deals on electric cars (18 of them have committed to purchases already as ‘founding cities’). Altogether, these metropoles own 115,000 vehicles that need replacing at some point, with a value of $10 billion—a chunky number that makes negotiating easy. And in an effort to spur even more electric uptake, the deals they reach will be available to any city in the country via a new website, launching today. It’s collective bargaining, but for cars.

The new website is EVfleets.org. The goal of LA’s new plan is to make it less of a hassle for all cities (even smaller ones) to move forward in this combined effort to adopt electric cars. Cars like the Chevrolet Bolt EV are now available on the new site for $5,000 under MSRP, at $32,702. The Ford Fusion Energi (PHEV) is also an option, with a $2,000 discount. This means cities don’t have to spend extra time negotiating a fleet discount since those are already being offered up ahead of the deal.

We certainly hope many cities will adopt such plans and also many more local governments will initiate goals much like that of Los Angeles.

Source: Wired

Categories: Chevrolet, Ford, General

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13 Comments on "LA Teams With 30 Cities To Get Cheaper EVs For Fleets"

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SJC

They could pool together for EV buses, but they wait for the transit districts to get off the dime.

Assaf

Great site! They seem to have pre-orders for 2019 Leafs (225 miles range and likely also TMS) for $26.5k. That’s likely the best deal there.

Followed by the 2018 Prius Prime for $25k. Since I presume municipalities cannot get an IRS discount (do they get something alternative?) the Prime may end up cheaper than the Leaf. But then, you get less of an EV and one seat less, plus one model year older.

Everything else on the current list is >$30k.

Astros

I would assume that the 2019 Leafs they list are the 40kWh variety, not the upgraded ones.

Leasehackr.com

$647/month to lease a Bolt EV? You can find one for half that cost in Southern California as a savvy consumer.

It’s questionable whether buying in volume actually saves money on a new car. The best deals are often losses to the dealer. Why would a dealer commit to losing money on 50 units, at a loss of $3,000 per vehicle — when all they may need is 3 or 4 units sold at a loss to meet their monthly target for a volume bonus from the manufacturer?

Will

Just team up with other cities for police vehicles Tesla, this time they won’t be unused like the i3

Ron M

115,000 vehicles will probably take 10 years to replace them all. Hopefully more cities do the same especially the big cities.

Unfortunately everytime someone does something good the EPA does something bad. There relaxing the rules on Methane emissions which when they flare Natural Gas, Methane is released. Methane traps 25X more heat in the atmosphere than CO2.

Currently in he Permian Basin oil companies flare off 10% of the natural gas. Equal to the supply of natural gas used by a state like Montana.

Bad enough wasting a natural resource but compound the problem with damaging the environment.

A number of people responsible should go to jail, but instead they’ll probably get a raise.

antrik

Natural gas *is* methane. Flaring it prevents release into the atmosphere… Though of course it still releases CO2, while completely wasting the energy.

Ron M

Flaring or burning up the natural gas releases the Methane directly to the atmosphere. Why do you think they have regulations prohibiting the amount that can be flared off. It’s also a hugh waste of money. Remember just the Permian basin flares off as much natural gas as Montana uses in a year.

antrik

No, burning natural gas a.k.a. methane releases CO2 and H20. Go check a chemistry book.

The reason they have regulations is that it’s a total waste. It releases CO2 without producing any energy. Which I already said.

Ron M

You must be using the Trump text books. Although I doubt that Trump ever read a book. Antrik your knowledge of chemistry matches Trump’s, Pruitts or the the new head of the EPA Wheeler nonexistent.

antrik

Ad hominem always makes for a convincing argument…

Ron M

I’m not wasting any more time arguing with a Rock. If you how to use Google then Google it.

William L

they should leased off LAPD, it seems like they have hundreds of BMW i3 sitting in the garage not been used.