Jaguar I-Pace Won’t Be Rated To Tow, Says CEO

5 months ago by Eric Loveday 17

Jaguar I-PACE Concept

Unlike the Tesla Model X, which can tow up to 5,000 pounds if properly equipped, the upcoming Jaguar I-Pace won’t be tow rated at all.

That news comes straight from Jaguar CEO Ian Callum via Twitter.

Sadly, The Jaguar I-Pace Won’t Be Tow Rated, According To Jaguar’s CEO

The Model X is officially an SUV, whereas the I-Pace is referred to as a CUV. We can’t say we really expected the I-Pace to be able to tow a big load, but even a rating of 1,500 pounds or so would add to its versatility.

Sadly, it seems the range hit from towing is “too much,” according to Callum.

Let’s look at the Model X and various consumption tests while towing to see the impact on range. Here’s an excellent graphic assembled by long-time Tesla owner and YouTuber Bjorn Nyland:

To over generalize the results, range can easily be cut in half when towing, so perhaps Callum has a point.

(Official EPA range rating for all versions of the Model X here)

Jaguar has been stated that it will beat future competitors to market with its ~220 mile (90 kWh), all-electric I-Pace, but could this towing omission hinder its success?

The I-Pace debuted just at the Los Angeles Auto Show (our full gallery live from LA here), and more recently in “Photon Red” from Geneva (gallery).

Production of the new SUV will take place at Magna Steyr’s Austrian facility beginning in 2018. Sales are expected to follow later in the same year. Jaguars hasn’t confirmed price, but estimates suggest it should start at around $70,000 (£55,000).

Also of note: Just this week, the production intent car was caught out driving around, so everything appears to be well on track to be released in the public in about 12 months time.

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17 responses to "Jaguar I-Pace Won’t Be Rated To Tow, Says CEO"

  1. Terawatt says:

    I don’t get this line of reasoning at all. Granted, the i-Pace is not likely to be a great caravaner, because of the range and also because DCFC infratstrucutre isn’t at all adapted to let you charge with a caravan in tow, compounding the problem. If you have to charge often and additionally need to find somewhere to put the caravan while doing so it would quickly get pretty tedious…

    But even so, towing isn’t just about camping holidays. Where I live, in southern Norway, a *lot* of people have a boat that needs to be moved between winter storage and the sea twice a year. Even those who don’t have a boat borrow a hanger for a few hours at Ikea to get stuff home easily, or transport shrubbery from their garden away in spring, or do something or other a few times a year that requires being able to tow, but not a whole caravan and not over a long distance.

    In these plentiful cases, where you have much more range than you need even when towing, it makes no more sense to omit the capability because it reduces range in an EV than it would in an ICE! It is exactly the same situation; towing reduces ICE range too, after all – it just doesn’t matter as long as you can still do what you need to conveniently.

    It can’t be that having towing capability makes homologation much more expensive (as long as you plan for it from the beginning – getting a vehicle re-homologated is another matter entirely), because if it was it would not be the case that nearly all cars are capable of towing.

    What a wasted opportunity.

    1. Hauer says:

      Yep.
      Transporting stuff for house and garden. Light trailer needed a few days per year.
      Needed range in my case: 25km.

      1. Miggy says:

        Agree this no towing would be a deal breaker for me, the i-pace was on top of my list for next year but not now.
        The Tesla S is not tow rated and I’m not sold on the X.
        Liked the look of the i-pace but only with a tow-bar.

    2. Dan says:

      Even cars similar to the i Pace in size with gas engines like the BMW X1/X3 are only rated for light loads: 500-750kg towing. You should talk to your friends who own boats. It’ll take a bigger car to tow most boats.

      1. Alonso Perez says:

        Not really. In the northeast US lots of people have small sailboats for use in lakes. They are obviously light. Glider pilots tow gliders around the world. These are long trailers but also very light. The glider itself can weigh 600 pounds. The combination maybe 1500, if that. There is a definitely a class of drivers who need a few hundred to less than 1500 pounds.

  2. William L. says:

    I doubt it. Biggest factor is price, it has to cost at least 10% less than than Model X with similar range for people to consider i-pace.

    1. Hauer says:

      You ARE aware that iPace is the same length as model 3?

      1. Rich says:

        The Jaguar I-Pace is the same length and width as the model 3

  3. Seraphim Elizabeth says:

    ~When I saw Jaguar was advertising the new Tesla as it’s own, and NOW this I-Pace; the last thing on my mind is it’s towing capacity! The first thought was, when I think of Jaguar one imagines beauty and grace, high end expensive detail, technology in comfort as well as esthetics… WTH is that cheap American looking thing hiding behind the Jaguar name? What’s going on with Jaguar? All of us who’ve known this vehicle to be driven/ purchased by people who appreciate fine engineering, can afford it and EXPECT IT … must surely be disappointed. Just the words “JAGUAR I-PACE” looks like an oxymoron, a mistake, or a joke. Who cares if the I-PACE could tow a shoebox … look at IT!! Ugh

  4. SJC says:

    Jaguar owners may not tow a lot, people who own Tahoe SUVs tow.

  5. Sublime says:

    I think more important than towing capacity is GVWR for section 179 deductions.

  6. pjwood1 says:

    “EV’s that tow” still seems pretty kinky

  7. Anders Skar says:

    Ian Callum is not CEO of Jaguar. He is the design director.

  8. randomhuman says:

    Mhmm I don’t get why. I mean I wouldn’t even need a huge towing capability. A few days ago my father and I were hauling construction waste. We don’t do that very often but it has to be done sometimes. We also only have a 260kg (573lbs) rated trailer, which shouldn’t be a problem for almost any car be it electric or gas powered. We had to drive twice because we had a little over 500kg and we only drove like 40km (24miles) or so. That’s easy achievable even by that I-Pace or of course the Model X. I don’t get it. They’re really trying to make electric cars look like second class cars…but they’re not!

  9. cab says:

    Is the average person ever towing anything these days? I think everyone I know who does tow (a small percentage) all tow with either trucks or full-size SUVs…no one tows with a car or small SUV. There are some I’m sure who do, but most are going to be fringe use cases…this won’t impact sales anywhere near as much as the lack of ability to leave town due to a poor charging network (i.e. non-existent, broken, too slow – take your pick).

    Flash forward 15 years:

    Person 1: “I’m going to go fill up at the Tesla station, anybody want me to pick up some beers?”

    Person 2: “Yeah, get me a case of bud. Hey, didn’t Tesla used to make cars?”

    Person 1: “Yeah, but now they just sell electricity…B*stards are really marking it up lately too”

    He who controls the Spice, controls the universe!

  10. Rad says:

    I drive a Ford Taurus and tow a pop up trailer 5-6 times a year. Usually 50 – 100 miles. One long trip a year, maybe 400 miles each way. The trailer weighs 1500 lbs with all our stuff. The hitch also works great to carry bikes without messing up the paint job. We thought about buying an Suv but decided on the Taurus – more comfort and it fits in the garage.

    You are right, we are about the only ones in the campground with a car.

  11. Erik says:

    It’s a regional thing. In Europe and the Nordic countries in particular, the high fuel prices make full-size trucks unpopular so people want towing abilities on their regular cars.

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