Jaguar, Land Rover Commits To “Electrification” Of Every All New Model By 2020

3 weeks ago by Mark Kane 10

Jaguar I-PACE Concept

Jaguar Land Rover has announced a new plan of electrification…kinda.  From 2020, all new models are to be electrified (all-electric, plug-in hybrid or at least hybrid).

2018 Range Rover Sport P400e

The devil is in the details.

Besides the “electrification” tag, it will take several years to get to the point when all models will become electrified, as JLR is saying that “all-new products” introduced from 2020 on will be electrified (not that all its current offerings will be given that function by 2020).  So it will be yet a long time before each model has the ability to plug in.

However, Jaguar will begin its plug-in road shortly, with with long-range all-electric I-PACE arriving next Summer. The I-PACE is equipped with 90 kWh battery, good for at least 355 km/220 miles of range.

The market launch of the all-electric Jag will be reinforced with special I-PACE eTROPHY in 2018/2019.

The Land Rover division starts its conversion to electricity with plug-in hybrids: Range Rover and Range Rover Sport. Recentlym the company unveiled the 2018 Range Rover Sport P400e with up to 31 miles (50 km) of pure electric range.

Step by step, all the models are expected to be electrified, which is an unprecedented switch for a manufacturer that for long time heavily relied on the gasoline V-8.

““As of 2020, every all-new product will have some form of electrification,” Dave Larsen, director-product planning at Jaguar Land Rover North America, says during a recent Jaguar event here. It will take several years before all vehicles in each portfolio are affected.

Vehicles announced so far include Jaguar’s first all-electric car, the I-Pace, which debuted in concept form at last year’s Los Angeles auto show and will go on sale next summer with a 90-kWh battery capable of driving the 5-passenger utility vehicle 240 miles (386 km) on a single charge, Larsen says.

Also getting the green light are plug-in hybrid versions of the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport luxury SUVs, launching in mid-2018. The automaker has yet to reveal technical details about those powertrains but ensures an electric range of about 31 miles (50 km).”

source: WardsAuto

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10 responses to "Jaguar, Land Rover Commits To “Electrification” Of Every All New Model By 2020"

  1. TM says:

    that is good news

  2. PJ says:

    Does this mean that any new model after 2020 won’t have a standard ice version, only mild hybrid and up. Or will there be an ice version but there will also be an electrified version as well?

    1. sveno says:

      all future models come with electric headlights standard 🙂

  3. SJC says:

    Market speak, “every all new model”. You can parse that as a totally new model that has not been offered before.

    1. Vexar says:

      I saw that, too. This is marketing speak for “any time we come up with an all-new vehicle model, it will be a hybrid, three years from now; it could be more, but we’re not promising that.” It also means “All our popular, successful existing models will remain untouched in the powertrain.”

      Someone doesn’t have the money to build new technology! I would not be surprised if Jaguar gets sold in 2022. Heck, Chrysler is down to a Minivan, a large sedan, oh, and that Minivan again.

      1. Gazz says:

        JLR is owned by Tata which is massive so the money is probably there.

  4. John says:

    Welcome to yet another episode of: “Just you wait and see what we will be doing 2-3 years from now”…

  5. Lawrence says:

    When Land Rovers have autonomous driving, are they still going to drive around like complete *******’s like they do today?

    1. bogdan says:

      Who mentioned anything about Land Rover with autonomous driving?
      Most carmakers won’t make it in the next decade, Land Rover will be one of them.
      They don’t even dream of making autonomous vehicles.

  6. Sujay Rao Mandavilli says:

    This sounds far too ambitious. The right strategy may be to wait for the technology to mature.

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