Jaguar Design Chief Discusses I-Pace, Says Proper BMS Is Vital

APR 17 2018 BY MARK KANE 16

Wolfgang Ziebart, the Technical Design Director at Jaguar, recently shared thoughts on the development of the all-electric I-Pace.

Jaguar I-Pace

After more than three-years with Jaguar, Ziebart said that the I-Pace was the most exciting project in his career.

The goal was to combine performance (0-60 mph in 4.5 seconds), long-range (240 miles expected in EPA rating) and a smooth ride.

Asked about the tough choices, he said that there was need to understand and evaluate the best type of electric motors, inverters, costs of the powertrain and so on.

See Also – Jaguar I-PACE Shines In New York – Videos

There was definitely a need to find the most suitable battery chemistry in terms of energy density, charging and discharging capabilities, price, operating temperatures and longevity.

“There are so many choices … it starts with the motors. There are induction, permanent magnet, switch-reluctance motors and so on. To take one or the other you must have the characteristics of each in your head, and also the impact each has on the inverter. What protection circuit, for instance, is required in the inverter? How much does this cost? No one can know everything, of course, so we listened to outside experts. But when one of them or one of our own engineers takes a really strong, impassioned position, you have to have the depth of knowledge to evaluate.”

The most important part turns out to be the in-house developed battery management system (the software, to be precise).

“The most important element in this or any electric car is the battery management system. That is why we have all this in-house. The development of the software for battery management was done by our team, not delegated to some supplier.”

Jaguar I-Pace

Jaguar I-Pace
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Source: Automotive News

Categories: Jaguar

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16 Comments on "Jaguar Design Chief Discusses I-Pace, Says Proper BMS Is Vital"

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Apparently Nissan did not get the memo.

I wonder if VW got the memo for e-Golf.

There is a difference between TMS and BMS.

Yes, they are different but not separate. Thermal management is part of battery management.

“some supplier” like LG Chem who has worlds more battery experience than Jag. They did however delegate the module design to “some supplier” because building batteries isn’t a core competency…

I agree that TMS is best for battery longevity, but while the Leaf is notorious for battery degradation, why are e-Golf drivers not also complaining? Could it be that VW designed a battery pack that is much better than the Leaf pack? Or do e-Golf drivers not complain much? Anybody have any data on e-Golf pack degradation?

I don’t think Ionic, Kia Soulev and some others have TMS of this kind and didn’t heur much complain either.

( hear)

SoulEV and others at least have fan air cooled batteries. Nissan doesn’t even have this and has the battery packed in the box.

LEAF packs all their modules together with poor air flow. The modules under the front seats are the first to go, that is where the heat builds up.

“do e-Golf drivers not complain much? Anybody have any data on e-Golf pack degradation?”

First of all, they are mostly sold in CARB only states where temperature is more mild.

Second of all, they crank down charging rate when the battery gets hot. And that has been reported by both E-golf and Kia Soul EV owners.

Lastly, they have far smaller sample sizes and most are leased so less data/incentives to complain.

Er have 4 at work, and some use e-golf as their private car too. Never heard any complain. Then again, er don’t live in a semi desert area either.
In Norway it has been one of the best seiling cars.
It is a looong waiting line for the car now, and is the main limmitation on sales.
Then again.. have not heard so much of LEAF battery problems either.

Could it be a case of scale? There are a lot of Leaf in a lot of markets. EGolf is a compliance car sold in limited markets and limited numbers. If 1 eGolf owner complains then you don’t really hear it, but if 5,000 Leaf owners complain then you are more likely to hear it. That’s my take on it. EGolf might only be sold in mild to cold climate, where Leaf also does Ok.

The e-Golf, in Europe at least, sells just below Tesla Model S numbers, and comfortably above Tesla Model X numbers.

BMS = battery management system, which encompasses charge current regulation, discharge current monitoring, cell voltage and temperature (only to prevent battery cell damage) and battery balancing. The BMS may be in control of or integrated with the TMS.

TMS = Thermal Management System, which is basically in charge of temperature monitoring and control, to regulate battery charge temperature and to optimize cell temperature for optimum power transfer.

Not having a TMS means you have a less-efficient car that either can’t respond well to environmental changes or will suffer premature battery pack degradation.

Not having at least a rudimentary BMS means you have constructed a bomb. At some point you will have a thermal cascade that can set the pack on fire or cause cell shorting.

obJustification: I design this stuff for a living.

BMS also does isolation monitoring, pre charge, contractor control, HV measurement, HVIL, power limits, soc and soh estimation. Plus a few thousand diagnostic checks.