Iris Viseo…Umm, Interesting? (Video)




The text that accompanies the video (translated from French) reads:

Telescopic cockpit approved vehicle road to be up to 3 meters high, this electric vehicle is a global innovation.

Designed and manufactured in France by Iris France, it is intended to be operated by public and private securities, as well as media companies and event.

But really…what’s the point of this telescopic cockpit car?  It seems rather silly to us.

Category: General

9 responses to "Iris Viseo…Umm, Interesting? (Video)"
  1. Djoni says:

    It’s a watchtower for inspecting purpose.
    Lead acid battery have been choose for dead weighting the thing in motion and stabilise in over 100 km/h wind.
    25 km/h speed limit, it’s a definite purpose vehicule.

  2. Big Solar says:


  3. dan says:

    2nd video:

    Website (in French):

  4. an_outsider says:

    In short, it is a faster (25 km/h) one operator boom lift, propelled with lead acid batteries selected by design for their mass, to increase its “stability”, right … ?

  5. Draighven says:

    It’s for getting a view over SUVs that block your view at an intersection. At least that’s the only thing I can think of it being useful for.

  6. Mikael says:

    The Pope whould have one of those… 😛

  7. Three Electrics says:

    Don’t show Elon, or the Model X will never ship!

  8. Lensman says:

    So, it’s a mashup between a cherry-picker and a NEV (“quadricycle electrique” is French for low-speed Neighborhood Electric Vehicle) which, bizarrely, appears to be designed to look like a sports car.

    Okay, I can die happy now; clearly I’ve seen everything. 🙂

  9. Lensman says:

    “…it is intended to be operated by public and private securities, as well as media companies and event.”

    I’m just trying to envision that any security firm would consider it so important for their security guards to get an elevated view from an eye height of maybe 10 feet or so off the ground, that they’d spend money on a low-speed vehicle that operates as a very stunted cherry-picker. Trying hard, yet failing utterly.

    This seems to be a case of a solution searching rather desperately for a problem. The French may often be silly, but I don’t think they’re that silly.