Infographic: GM Says 2014 Chevy Spark EV Saves Buyers Lot of Money

AUG 7 2013 BY STAFF 19

Spark EV Inforgraphic

Spark EV Infographic – Click to Enlarge

General Motors is highlighting the amount of money that the 2014 Chevrolet Spark EV can save you.

And all you need to do is buy one.

Spark EV Helps You "Find New Roads" and Save Lots of Cash

Spark EV Helps You “Find New Roads” and Save Lots of Cash

This infographic, released by GM, shows that by buying a Spark EV, you can save lots of loot.

Cristi Landy, director of Chevrolet small car and electrified vehicle marketing, states:

“Spark EV is one of the most affordable EVs on the market, with one of the lowest costs of ownership of any new vehicle out there.  Spark EV is a great city car that rewards frequent use by being fun, efficient and affordable.”

Interested in purchasing any of these items?

  • Airfare for an around-the-world trip
  • A Viking outdoor grill
  • 6 pairs of Google Glasses
  • 60 Nike+ FuelBands
  • 6,425 Starbucks Tall Coffee of the Days

Spark EV will make it possible, says GM.

The 2014 Chevy Spark EV is priced at $19,995 after the federal tax credit of $7,500 or it can be leased for as low as $199 per month with $999 down.

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19 Comments on "Infographic: GM Says 2014 Chevy Spark EV Saves Buyers Lot of Money"

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I don’t think typical drivers go to the gas station 5 times/month.

Let’s go with 40 miles/day with a 450 range tank. So you fill up every 10 days.
That’s 3 x a month. or 36 times/year x 5 min = 180 minutes/year

Plugging in/unplugging takes 5 seconds each so 10 seconds total.
365 days x 10 seconds / 60 = 60 minutes/year

So plugging in cuts your fueling time by 1/3.

Time yourself the next time you enter a gas station property. I bet it’s more than a 5 minute stop on average.

Didn’t Elon already do this and it was 90sec x 2 = 3 minutes?

I don’t know about that. Most folks that I know fill up once a week unless they drive on the weekends. Then 5 times a month is reasonable. Even my Dodge truck with a 35 gallon tank doesn’t go 450 miles on a fill-up. That would be a Prius range vehicle.

Perhaps, but as stated its probably gas station stops longer, and then there are the repair hassles. EVs are a lot lower in the respect.

So it is $19,000 “after credits applied” and a $199 lease.

How is this anything but a crappy version of the leaf? They would be about the same price “after credits applied”.

While the Spark EV is smaller, rumor has it that it has significantly more range than the LEAF under near identical test conditions despite having a smaller battery pack.

I have driven both and it is a much different drive than the Leaf. In many respects more fun and more efficient. However, it doesn’t have the trunk space of the Leaf so if that is important to you then the Leaf is a better choice.

The Leaf is over $2000 more than the Spark EV.
The Spark EV has 400ft-lb of torque.
The Leaf has more interior room.

> How is this anything but a crappy version of the leaf? They would be about the same price “after credits applied”.

Well, with TMS it may be that the Leaf is the “crappy” version in a place like Phoenix. Not saying I would want the Spark in West Los Angeles though… I will stick with my Leaf.

If I had to bet I would bet that the Spark EV with it’s A123 batteries and TMS will significantly outlast the LEAF battery in just about any climate where temperatures exceed 75F.

It appears that your typical Los Angeles LEAF battery is down around 15% capacity after 2 years and 20-24k miles based on user reports.

> It appears that your typical Los Angeles LEAF battery is down around 15% capacity after 2 years and 20-24k miles based on user reports.

That is fairly accurate, although I think my Leaf is doing better than that (11-12% loss). However, without user data on Spark batteries and without a way to read capacity loss like we now have for the Leaf, hard to be sure how much better the Spark battery life.

Exactly. The primary reason for using the the Liquid Thermal Management System for the battery is to extend battery capacity, faster charging, more efficient break regeneration, and longer battery life.

The Volt, Spark EV, Tesla Model S, Focus Electric, i3 and i8 all have a liquid thermal management system.

Anyone else think this is an amateurish and crappy info graphic?

Naw I actually thought that was pretty funny…

The Spark has thermal management ? (assume that’s what TMS means) That’s pretty significant, since my understanding is it makes fast charging several times a day possible. With the frankencharger, perhaps GM understands that rolling out fast chargers everywhere could be the key…

Yes, Spark has TMS (thermal management system).

not drivable, its too ugly same with the lead

I was wondering. What car don’t you find ugly?