Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell Accumulates Enough Miles On The Road To Reach The Moon

MAR 15 2015 BY MARK KANE 35

Hyundai Tuscon Fuel Cell

Hyundai Tuscon Fuel Cell

Hyundai happily announced a milestone of 238,900 miles covered by Tuscon Fuel Cell drivers in Southern California.

238,900 miles is the average distance from the Earth to the Moon, hence the reference to the Moon.

By the way, the Korean manufacturer revealed that since June 2014, it delivered over 60 Tuscon Fuel Cell vehicles. Despite only delivering 60 units thus far, Hyundai is considering this model as “the first mass-produced fuel cell“.

On average, every car covered some 4,000 miles in less than 10 months. Some of them maybe even exceeded 10,000 miles.

“Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell drivers have surpassed an impressive threshold, recently accumulating more than 238,900 miles on the roads of Southern California, all while emitting only clean water vapor. The average distance from the earth to the moon varies with the lunar orbit, with 238,900 miles as an average estimated distance. Hyundai has delivered more than 60 Tucson Fuel Cells since its introduction as the first mass-produced fuel cell in the U.S. market in June 2014.

Mike O’Brien, vice president, corporate and product planning, Hyundai Motor America said:

“Surpassing this fundamental stellar threshold gives us a glimpse into the unlimited zero-emissions potential for Hyundai fuel cells. If a small fleet of hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles can accumulate this kind of mileage in just a few short months, one can only imagine the potential for a zero-emissions hydrogen vehicle future.”

Range of the Hyundai Tuscon Fuel Cell stands at some 265 miles:

TUCSON FUEL CELL ADVANTAGES
The Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell CUV has a number of advantages. The energy-rich hydrogen fuel provides an estimated driving range of 265 miles between fill-ups, similar to many gasoline vehicles. Further, both fuel cell driving range and vehicle performance are minimally affected by either extreme hot or cold ambient temperatures, giving owners an extra measure of peace of mind as they go about their day. Even more important for consumers transitioning for gasoline vehicles, the Tucson Fuel Cell can be refilled with hydrogen in about the same time as a typical gasoline vehicle of the same size, less than 10 minutes.

Finally, fuel cell vehicles, due to their compact, relatively lightweight fuel cell stack design, are completely production scalable from very small to very large vehicles, such as urban-focused mini-compact cars all the way to full-size buses and trucks.”

Categories: Hyundai

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35 Comments on "Hyundai Tucson Fuel Cell Accumulates Enough Miles On The Road To Reach The Moon"

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It would have been cheaper for Hyundai to send a car to the moon with a rocket instead.
And more good PR….

I’d love to see a map of all hydrogen fueling stations with a circle around them showing 100mi… That’s about as far away you’d want to get to ensure you’ve got enough fuel for a return trip.

WOW. So their entire fleet of fuel cell drivers have driven a little more hydrogen miles than I have personally driven on electric! I’m approaching 170,000 electric miles since getting my MINI-E in 2009. Color me unimpressed

Durability? Is that the point of Hyundai’s announcement?

If so, then 4000 miles per car doesn’t prove much in terms of durability.

“Despite only delivering 60 units thus far, Hyundai is considering this model as “the first mass-produced fuel cell“.”

Well, Hyundai is wrong. Honda beat them with their FCX Clarity.

From 2008 to 2014, only 45 were leased in US. So, I would say, Hyundai did a better job.

The point of Hyundai’s press release is to fight FUD spread by BEV knuckleheads (aka Eloonites) led by Elon, who scare people of refueling issues and the ‘dangers’ ( laugh) of Hydrogen. Well, 238900 miles and no fires. Not like the Teslas lighting up on the road sides.

“The point of Hyundai’s press release is to fight FUD spread by BEV knuckleheads (aka Eloonites)”

Okay..

“Well, 238900 miles and no fires. Not like the Teslas lighting up on the road sides.”

Tesla announced in their Q4 shareholder letter Tesla customers have logged > 750M miles to date.

There have been, what, a total of 6 fires involving a Model S in that time? I haven’t seen a report in a year; either the Tesla fire media frenzy subsided or there simply hasn’t been anything interesting to report.

Sometimes I can’t tell if you’re being willfully obtuse or simply trolling.

OK. I guess you don’t remember the July 4th fireworks last year. And not counting the garage fires either, are you?

That’s counting two highway debris-related fires in late 2013, since mitigated; two garage fires in late 2013/early 2014, one likely due to faulty outlet wiring (since mitigated), one cause unknown; one very high-speed collision in Mexico, late 2013; one very high-speed collision during stolen-car pursuit, July 2014 (counted but later than I recalled). Are there many other fires that would support a claim of “Tesla’s lighting up the road sides” as anything other than FUD?

Statistically you would expect to see some fires in Europe as well as sales ramp up, but much of the European sales have been after mitigations have been introduced in the US.

Considering the media frenzy over Tesla fires, it’s reasonable to suppose that most Tesla fires are reported. And 6 reported fires in 750M vehicle miles is significantly better than the US average of approximately 1 per 20M miles.

Well, the garage fire was to these eyes due to an incompetantly designed charger cord plug Tesla supplies with the “S”. You’re right that its not due to the INSPECTOR or electrician.

But, as Tesla says the car ITSELF didn’t cause the garage fire, and, more to the point, its an easily avoided problem.

Now because of the extreme pressures that H2 vehicle work, I’m wondering how great all the fittings are going to be in locales such as mine where we have Rock Salt, Snow, and Cold eating into all their fabulous piping?

They may have done a (marginally!) better job but the claim is that they are the first, that is incorrect.

“Hyundai happily announced a milestone of 238,900 miles covered by Tuscon Fuel Cell drivers in Southern California.”
“since June 2014, it delivered over 60 Tuscon Fuel Cell vehicles. Despite only delivering 60 units thus far”

That’s 60 FVEV averaging 4000 miles each over 10 months. ie: only 400 miles per month, or 4,800 miles per year … about 1/3 the average US vehicle.

At the rate of 400 miles per month, it would take a single Tuscon Fuel Cell vehicle almost 50 years to reach the Moon!

In comparison there are LEAFs and Model S’s 1-3 years old with over 100,000 miles.

You erroneously assume that all those vehicles are 10 months old. Most of them are obviously much younger.

If deliveries actually slowly ramped up over the last year, the average is likely somewhere between 3 to 5 months — meaning Tucson FCV drivers use their vehicle just as much as anyone else, if not slightly more.

+1. 1000 miles/month is average just for commuting and making the local trips. As the car is not very expensive as Tesla Model S, Hydrogen is included in $499/mo lease, and the Tucson is pretty roomy, there is no sense in not using it in all the local trips in LA area. And LA area has a lot of fun places for weekends too, including San Diego.
I think, those who leased it will be hitting their 12K miles/yr limits easily.

With ~250 mi range, not many people will be driving their Tucson FCV to San Diego for the weekend unless they’ll just be parking it there.

No public FC stations in San Diego (one is planned).

Thanks, was just pointing out how meaningless distance reference is to average vehicle driving distance. It would have be more informative if a stat like “60 Tuscon FCV drivers are now driving 1,xxx miles per month”.

There are some bits of info on the Tucson FCV forum here:
http://www.mytucsonfuelcell.com/forum/

There are so few cars, that any info is scarce. It would be nice if we can get an article from some Tucson FCV owner with real life experiences.

One piece of info on that forum is that Tucson FCV and Toyota Mirai are engaged in a price war in Korea. Hyundai is thinking of cutting the price of Tucson FCV from $139K to match Mirai’s $62K. From the price point of view, Toyota is definitely leading at this point. $60K with additional $12500 rebate makes it affordable to the upper middle class in the US.

Oy.

So Hyundai is prepared to lose another $50k to move the metal.

That’s not sustainable.

This fool cell nonsense only shows how powerful are oil & gas cartels to impose a scientifically and economically totally irrationnal solution, just to keep us captive of the fuel pump.

They can “impose” away, but I think that very few people are going to be foolish enough to buy a “fool cell” car for personal use. I think most sales of these new FCVs will be to existing fleets which have their own hydrogen fueling station already set up.

Don’t underestimate hundred of millions, fully funded long term marketing plans.

Interestingly, most fuel cell work is out of Japan, a country which is remarkably poor in fossil fuel resources. One need only remember Pearl Harbor to realize that it would be a terrible strategic error for the Japanese to promote a fuel technology with compromises their national security.

It’s more likely that the Japanese just feel the technology is superior, given the wide variety of sources for hydrogen, including nuclear.

article quote:
“Finally, fuel cell vehicles, due to their compact, relatively lightweight fuel cell stack design, are completely production scalable from very small to very large vehicles, such as urban-focused mini-compact cars all the way to full-size buses and trucks.”

This is the key take away. The energy density of H2 is way better than a battery. You are not going to launch one of Elons rockets on batteries. The space shuttle used H2.

If they can capture the carbon when they make the fuel and then use it another way then reforming is not bad. Then add some H2 made from wind..

Also if you can use H2 to store wind energy for cheaper than a battery then why not do it.

Not everyone lives in a sunny climate where solar cells fill the bill.

1. Hydrogen has good gravimetric energy density; that is, it has a good energy/weight ratio. But compared to liquid fuels, it has lousy volumetric energy density; that is, it has far more volume than (for example) gasoline or kerosene for the same energy content. That’s why it’s only used in the booster stage of rockets, never upper stages.

2. Carbon capture is a joke. For example, there’s no such thing as “clean coal” tech.

3. Even if carbon capture could be 99%+ efficient, that still wouldn’t change the fact that reforming natural gas into hydrogen is horribly energy inefficient. From a “green” perspective, what’s the point of throwing away about 75% of the energy in natural gas by converting it to hydrogen for “fool cell” cars? Any realistic well-to-wheel analysis will easily show that you’d generate far less actual pollution (and yes, carbon too) by burning the natural gas directly.

By now, everyone should realize that the “hydrogen economy” is a greenwashing propaganda scheme promoted by Big Oil.

Please check your facts on SMR. It’s 70~80% efficient.

Liquid H2 was used in the second and third stages of the Saturn V. I’m not a rocket scientist, but I believe you want to burn your heavy fuel first, as the upper stages are simply payload until the lower stages are jettisoned.

That’s what I want. A car that’s powered by rocket fuel.

That sounds safe. Probably really cheap too.

“On average, every car covered some 4,000 miles in less than 10 months.”

So they are doing about 1/2 what a normal car does?

think it will be a Long Time coming before fuel cell cars will be mass produced ,unless maybe if they’ll run on some other Fuel That Is easily attainable…Hydrogen Is Dangerous & Highly pressurized .((((as in Hydrogen BomB))) ..Battery Technology is moving Fast! with all The Renewable Wind, Solar Etc: I agree With Elon Musk ” Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars Are “BS”

References to the hydrogen bomb crack me up. People don’t seem to have any grasp of how difficult it is to start nuclear fusion (the process of fusing two Hydrogen atoms into one Helium atom – what happens in a Hydrogen bomb detonation). It takes so much energy that they literally need to detonate a fission bomb (A-bomb) just to trigger the fusion bomb (H-bomb).

Hydrogen is incredibly flammable. We need to worry about that in a vehicle. But the idea of a FCV turning into a “hydrogen bomb” is hysterically absurd.

“…Hydrogen is incredibly flammable.”

Yup, people I respect say its about the same problem as Gasoline.

But yeah, people either bring up the hydrogen bomb or else the Hindenburg. Neither of which burned hydrogen, or at least, not in the beginning of the problem.

Lustuccc,, Ur 100% On The Money! Its Mostly Oil Co’s “BS” To Keep Us Hostage to Hi Fuel Prices..+++ Traditional Car Co’s R In Bed With BIG OIL , Gas Cars R High Maintenance, That Way Car Co’s Can Sell Us More Parts.. They Both WIN! The GAS GOUGING ???ETC: Believe Me The Earth Will Never Run Out Of Oil!!! It is a Natural Occurance )))OIL IS THE COOLING SYSTEM OF THIS PLANET(((.The Earth Produces Its Own Oil to “Maintain A Temperature”.. …Removing it, is also , a BIG Part, of the reason, for “GLOBAL WARMING” It Was not Intended to be “SUCKED OUT” To Be Burned Up!

This is looking like the next auto I will purchase.

I really wish they would release a Tucson PHEV so we could compare tech in the same car.

I have negative interest in a FCV Tuscon, but would have jumped on a PHEV Tuscon if it had 25+ mile AER.

I’m wondering how many 2015 Impala dual-fuel CNG cars have been sold. You can buy them as a single individual from your Chevy Dealer. No good home refuelers as of yet, but my Gas company is currently chaging $1.15 a gallon equivalent if you live near one of their stations.

CNG seems to me much more cost-effective and more to the point of these blogs the “CLEANCITIES” group goes GAGA over anything CNG,LNG or propane, but yet doesn’t seem to be pushing Hydrogen to hard nor EV’s as of yet.

Since many people have gas service, and many gas utilities have dispensers set up, I’d think CNG is much more practical than hydrogen. Of course PARKER and Dresseur-Clark, and General Electric I’m sure are also promoting Hydrogen to sell a lot of compressors for those overpriced filling stations.

But what happens to these companies when the Corporate Welfare runs out?

The CNG people can do in their own homes unsubsidized, although it looks like both EV’s and CNG’s are both going to get Bene’s from Obama.