UPDATE – Hyundai IONIQ Electric Compared To 2018 Nissan LEAF

JUL 2 2018 BY DOMENICK YONEY 41

Two solid choices with one big difference.

The 2018 Nissan LEAF and 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Electric are natural competitors. Both are all-electric compact four-door sedans with a hatch access to the back. Both are priced just below $30,000.

***UPDATE: Some additional information from Hyundai has been added at the bottom of the post.

As similar as they are, they also have a number of differences, mostly minor ones, and the video above runs through them. There is, as we mentioned, though, one big difference (not in the video) which we’ll get to in a moment. First, here are some of the smaller ones.

Size-wise, the two share the exact same wheelbase: 106.3 inches. Some other slight differences, though, are interesting to note because they affect the interior space. The Hyundai is slightly wider, leading to a bit more shoulder room for both front and back seat occupants. The Nissan is 4.3 inches taller and boasts more headroom for front seat occupants. The Ioniq Electric pulls ahead when it comes to legroom. In front, it’s just a smidge better, but rear passengers may enjoy the 2.2-inch edge.

When it comes to storage space, the tale of the tape gets pretty interesting. With the back seat in its normal upright position, the LEAF is the hands down winner here. The floor of the cargo area looks quite deep and its roof lacks the degree of slope the sportier-looking Ioniq Electric has. The result is a whopping 435 liters (15.36 cubic feet) of space, an 85-liter (3-cu ft) advantage. Fold the seats down, however, and the trophy gets handed back, with the Korean car somehow holding a massive 620-liter (21.9-cu ft) edge with 1,410 liters (49.79 cu ft) of space all told.

For electric vehicle aficionados, efficiency and range are key metrics.  In this arena, one seems to affect the other. The Nissan Leaf has a bigger battery and thus, more range: 151 EPA-rated miles to the Ioniq Electric’s 124 miles. This gain becomes a loss, though, when looking at efficiency. The LEAF weighs 269 more pounds and since it’s paired with a more powerful motor, which also gives it a performance edge up to its 89 mph top speed, its overall efficiency falls short of the numbers its competitor can produce. Here, the Ioniq enjoys a rating of 136 MPGe (combined City and Highway), 24 points better than the Japanese hatch.

The one big disparity between the two will also certainly make the difference when it comes to putting down cash, and that’s availability. Even if your heart is set on the Hyundai Ioniq Electric, it is only sold in California. Produced in limited quantities, even there it can be hard to find. Looking at the InsideEVs Sales Scorecard we can see it sold 32 copies in the U.S. in May 2018, making a measly 583 total units sold since its release in March of 2017. On the other hand, the Nissan LEAF seems quite available, selling 1,576 examples in May.

The 2019 model year may bring some improvements to the Ioniq Electric, both in terms of features and availability, but so too will the Nissan LEAF, as it will then ship with an optional larger, liquid-cooled battery. Combined with a number of other models coming to the market in 2019, the future electric landscape is looking more and more interesting — and competitive!

UPDATE – We had reached out to Hyundai earlier about availability and they’ve now responded.

Its communications team informs us that although it is only sold in California, there is still Ioniq Electric inventory available. (We suggest inquiring through a dealer.) Also, the 2019 model will be going into production quite soon.

2018 Nissan LEAF
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Hyundai IONIQ Electric
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Hyundai IONIQ Electric Hyundai IONIQ Electric Shares A Platform With Other More Conventional IONIQ Versions Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric (in Marina Blue) Hyundai IONIQ Electric  Is One Of Several Plug-In Hyundais Coming Soon Hyundai IONIQ Electric Gets A Boost Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric badging Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue Hyundai IONIQ Electric Marina Blue

Source: YouTube

Categories: Comparison, Hyundai, Nissan, Videos

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41 Comments on "UPDATE – Hyundai IONIQ Electric Compared To 2018 Nissan LEAF"

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To me the choice between the 2 is easy. Ionic, hands down!
Much better efficiency. Leaf gets 151 miles out of 40kWh while Ionic gets 124 miles out of only 28kWh!!! 0 to 60 times are pretty much the same.
Much faster fast charging capabilities for the Ionic.
Really the only thing i’m curious is how Nissan ProPilot compares to The ACC Ionic has.

The 0 – 60 Leaf’s 7.4 (Car and Driver) versus the Ioniq EV at 8.1 (C&D) are indeed close. I would suggest that neither is that great, although the Leaf gets closer to my minimum of a 7 second minimum 0 – 60 time for any vehicle.

Below 5 seconds, great
Below 6 seconds, good
Below 7 seconds, acceptable
Below 8 seconds, adequate
Below 9 seconds, poor
Below 10 seconds, inadequate
Below 11 seconds, buy a VW van

Yes, pretty close not pretty much the same.

Boys, boys, boys…..

My last car did 0-100 km/h in over 13 seconds and I never had any problems. 75 horsepower was still good enough for 175 km/h on the Autobahn!

Car and Driver got 8.6 for the Ioniq EV, not 8.1:
https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2017-hyundai-ioniq-electric-test-review

Their 30-50 test shows a big difference: 2.8s for the Leaf, 3.4 for the Ioniq. That’s 21% slower, and also 18% slower from 50-70.

That’s not close in my book.

I’ve driven a few of the economy EVs, and the Leaf feels a lot quicker than everything but the Bolt (C&D got 2.5s for 30-50, so only a bit faster there, but a lot quicker above 50). To me, it’s a significant selling point.

While i’m all in for Ioniq’s efficiency, the fact is that it is really a unicorn in terms of availability. Can’t get a new one here without waiting for 40 weeks (!) – I just pulled a trigger on a new Leaf instead. I like the looks more, it is much quicker off the line and at least here the reliability of ChaDeMo is impeccable – CCS feels like it’s a conspiracy of big auto designed to fail… 😉

I’m anyway travelling only a couple times a year, and my destinations will be within 1 fast charge in between so i really don’t care whether i get to charge with 40kW or 50 (no 100kW CCS chargers installed where i live).

Originally i wanted to wait for the 60kWh Leaf just because its rumoured 3-phase charging, but i got a good deal now so i’m not going to wait any longer. Rapidgate should not be an issue for me due to cold climate and intended use of the car.

@Mint: i3?

Leaf has 36kWh usable, not 40…

And that’s our fault? It’s a 40kWh battery, of course the range will be affected if the manufacturer decides to lock part of it to support long term range.

No one’s fault, just a statement of fact. IIRC, the Ioniq battery is actually over 30kWh in total size, but only 28kWh is usable so it’s not really anything different.

Got it! So 151 m on 40kWh is 3.775 m/kWh for Nissan, 124m on 30kWh so 4.133 m/kWh for Ionic… 10% better.

Hyundai’s battery technology is far better. Very fast DC charging (up to 70kW!), no issues with repeat DC charges, and less range loss in extreme cold.

But otherwise, the Leaf is the superior car:
-Acceleration is NOT “pretty much the same”, as the Ioniq is ~20% slower above 30mph.
-ProPilot is far better than Hyundai’s system, as shown by Bjorn Nyland.
-The Leaf has the best one-pedal driving system, and the Ioniq doesn’t come to a complete stop without hitting the brakes.
-The interior is more spacious in the Leaf, as it’s a taller car (which also makes it less efficient).
-If it’s not very cold, the Leaf will have more range from the larger battery.

If these factors don’t matter, the Ioniq is the better choice, assuming Hyundai builds more of them.

For me, it’s even easier…
The IONIQ BEV isn’t sold in Pennsylvania.

IoniqEV can charge lot quicker than Leaf, especially multiple charges on hot days, due to battery TMS on Hyundai. Leaf is over heating crap that sell by offering free charging to have people wait needlessly.

Leaf really is a commuter car, its not good for road trips.

Except many of those commuter use DCFC almost daily due to free charging.

Depends on the road trip. The Leaf can do ~300 miles reasonably comfortably, it’s just when someone tries to barnstorm the country that they run into problems.

Pro Pilot…. end of story… Well that, and I have not gotten to drive an IONIQ because there are none in Seattle.

What end of story?! The Ionic has ACC with lane assist too. I’m trying to figure out if there is really any difference between them.

Ionic options:
Smart Cruise Control with stop/start capability
Available Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection
Available Lane Keep Assist
Available Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross-traffic Alert and Lane Change Assist

Key, I have not gotten to drive IONIQ, just seen online reviews so I cannot comment on how good or bad it is.

Bjorn did a review. It’s not very good, and often ping-pongs from side to side:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDvlQmLvmVA

I have the Leaf, and ProPilot is far better.

That’s probably why Hyundai isn’t advertising it much.

The main difference seems to be the ability to stop the car if you don’t put the hands on the steering wheel. On the Ionic it just deactivates the system so you have to take over.

The main difference is that Hyundai’s system sucks. Watch the video. Look at it go side to side unless conditions are perfect.

I put ProPilot on and it works without interruption for 30km, handling all curves in the highway. The only issue is when I’m in the right lane, sometimes it gets confused by offramps, and of course you have to pay attention at all times for rare errors.

Why bother advertising what they can’t deliver anyway?

“Fold the seats down, however, and the trophy gets handed back, with the Korean car somehow holding a massive 620-liter (21.9-cu ft) edge with 1,410 liters (49.79 cu ft) of space ”
“Somehow”
I saw the video, stopped it to look at the seats, I don’t see almost twice the space, what am I missing?
On the other hand.
For the last four years I have been complaining about how the Leaf rear seats don’t at the very least tumble forward, let alone be removable like some other cars, that feature would make it competitive (maybe just for me) to some much larger cars.

I think you are forgetting that the rear seats of the Leaf sit directly on the battery hump. That battery hump would still be there even if you took the seats out. If you are looking for a lay flat cargo space you can buy the Leaf cargo organizer from Nissan.

I haven’t bought a cargo organizer yet but it looks the cargo area of the Leaf with the cargo organizer would make a nice little bed for taking a nap while charging or for over night charging at camp grounds.

All true, but there is that deep well behind the battery hump. If Nissan really wanted to pull off a neat trick, it would set up the rear seats to drop flat into that well, just like a lot of minivans can do. Then they’d have near Fit/Jazz levels of variability! They’d probably need to extend the body a little bit to get the length necessary, but a Leaf wagon is pretty much what I’ve wanted all along anyway.

I agree, the ability to tumble the seats forward would be a big improvement for the Leaf and increase the usefulness of the load area.

Hyundai does not seriously produce those EVs. The total US sales of ioniq EV is 151 in the first 5 months of 2018, and 815 Ioniq PHEV, 289 Sonata PHEV, 585 optima, 720 Soul, and 966 Niro PHEV. You just can not get any inventory.

Yep that is pretty much compliance-level of production, nothing serious.

One is available outside of CARB states.

I’d probably perfer the Ioniq here in Texas since it has thermal management. However, since it is impossible to get, the point is moot. When/if Nissan releases a new Leaf with TMS then I’ll consider it, and I suspect it will sell better. It was 104 degrees F most of the day today. My i3 and Volt were plugged in and I could hear them starting the cooling system periodically. That is reassuring to know the batteries aren’t sitting out there roasting.

I’ve heard that some people are buying Ioniqs in CA and shipping them to other states, but that’s only a rumor at this point…

I bought mine in July, 2017 and shipped it to Texas. I ordered the car when it was released and it took three months for it to be delivered to the dealer.

The small weight difference alone doesn’t account for the large difference in efficiency; and motor power should have no effect at all, beyond weight.

So is Hyundai planning to make the 2019s available for order at least in other CARB states, if not nationwide? Otherwise, I don’t see how they plan to meet the ZEV mandate unless they’ve been buying up credits.

So why does an article about two BEV cars compare them using MPGe? Are we still stuck in the ICE age?
mi/kWh or kWh/100km would be more appropriate.

Martin Messer Thomsen

You forget tje most important that the Ioniq can charge at 70 kW and the LEAF only 50 then the battery is at yhe right tempetatur. If you want to drive long distances this makes a big differance. That is why i got the Ioniq. Just done 750 km in one day with 4 fastcharge between 20 and 30 min on 50 kW.

Guys, stop fighting between ev’s ! Fight against ice cars ! They are the ones who should be baned !!!

Amen, millions of toxic emission spewing vehicles out there poisoning everyone day in, day out. It’s time we ban them in public like we did with cigarettes, it’s such an obvious public health issue that can be solved with existing technology and will power, so let’s do it already! Enough is enough!