General Motors Launches Baojun E100 Electric Car, Priced From *~$5,300

3 months ago by Steven Loveday 52

General Motors SAIC-GM-Wuling Baojun E100

SAIC-GM-Wuling Baojun E100 (Image Credit: General Motors)

It looks like the smart fortwo is about to have some worthy and very affordable competition…at least in China that is.

SAIC-GM-Wuling has launched the Baojun E100. It’s the first pure electric offering from the brand and will be available in two variants starting at RMB 35,800 (~US $5,300) after subsidies.

The E100 finds power from one motor, which puts out 110 N·m (74 lb-ft) of torque and 29 kW of power. It’s the ideal city car for China, with a range of up to 155 km (96 miles) on a single charge. Additionally, it has the capability to travel on the expressway, with its top speed of 100 km/h (62 mph). The E100 can be fully charged in 7.5 hours, and uses regenerative braking to add range while driving.

General Motors SAIC-GM-Wuling Baojun E100

SAIC-GM-Wuling Baojun E100 Interior. (Image Credit: General Motors)

The stylish and tiny urban EV measures 1,600 mm at its wheelbase, with a height of 1,670 mm. It seats two adults comfortably and has an impressive turning radius of 3.7 meters, meaning it can easily maneuver in and out of China’s cramped parking spaces and congested alleys.

The E100 comes with a handful of basic safety features, including a pedestrian alert system, parking sensors, and child safety seat locks. It also includes standard anti-lock brakes, electric power steering, and an electronic parking brake. Suspension is independent up front, with single-arm in the rear.

Interior features include a 7-inch touch-screen infotainment system and onboard Wi-Fi. The premium version gets a touchpad controller, keyless entry, and an air filter.

Sales started in Liuzhou, Guangxi in July, but were limited to 10 vehicles. Over 5,000 people applied to get a hand on the first 200 E100s. However, only another 500 will be available in Guangxi presently.

According to General Motors:

General Motors traces its roots back to 1908. GM has 10 joint ventures, two wholly owned foreign enterprises and more than 58,000 employees in China. GM and its joint ventures offer the broadest lineup of vehicles and brands among automakers in China. Passenger cars and commercial vehicles are sold under the Baojun, Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, Jiefang and Wuling brands. In 2016, GM delivered more than 3.8 million vehicles in China. More information on General Motors in China can be found at GM Media Online.

Source: GM

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53 responses to "General Motors Launches Baojun E100 Electric Car, Priced From *~$5,300"

  1. Mark.ca says:

    I’m usually not a fan of these half cars but at $5k i could get on board….anyone knows what is the full price?

    1. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

      Some NEV’s here in the US already cost more than that.

    2. Asak says:

      I wouldn’t be surprised if it can’t even sell them in the U.S. due to not meeting safety requirements.

      1. Rhaman 68 says:

        It is not about safety at all. Other brands have attempted to market microcars, Toyota and Smart Car and FIAT, with a dismal sales record. We do not need nor want that size cars regardless of the price!

        1. Paul GOVAN says:

          …because they’re way too expensive outside of China !

          Amazing how comment-posters and trolls simply cannot face up to the obvious ugly truth that “Western” carmakers just don’t want to see EVs expand beyond niche here – limit the choice, limit the range, charge exorbitant prices.
          Just how many more documentaries has Chris Paine(“Who Killed…”) gotta make before the population wakes up to the fact that Western carmakers still can’t stomach the prospect of EVs
          breaking out beyond niche and cannibalizing their core combustion market segment.
          As for the old “safety standards” alibi – utter nonsense. If improvements or alterations are required it would cost the likes of GM a pittance per mass-produced car !
          Anyone else wanna use EVs to express xenophobic hatred or competitive contempt for China and the Chinese ?
          Remember: GM holds the record for the biggest vehicle recall in history(over 11 million) – over 200 people died as a result of the ignition fault.

          Paul G
          Editor EVUK

    3. Dave86 says:

      I don’t see these as being for the USA market – probably wouldn’t meet crash requirements.

      However, these might also work in India. Isn’t the target price for a new vehicle in that country U.S. $5000? Also, I thought that India was going to limit new vehicle sales to electric in 2030.

      Would Japan be another market for this vehicle? I thought a problem US cars had in that market is they’re too big.

      If GM can move a lot of these vehicles in China and India, then that would increase battery volumes, which should help drive down battery prices for all vehicles.

      1. Terawatt says:

        Japan has very actively incentivized small cars – there’s even a special tax bracket for narrow ones, which is why the i-Miev is so narrow.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kei_car

    4. Alan Shaw says:

      For those of you who have the time to watch this in is entirety. I found it very interesting

  2. Detroit Electric says:

    This wouldn’t be the Spark EV that was sold in the U.S. would it? Just new sheet metal on the outside and extremely decontented for a cheaper price in China?

    1. WadeTyhon says:

      Not at all, I owned one. The Spark EV is an SUV compared to this. 😉

      Spark seats 4, has 4 doors, and has much more space in the hatch.

      1. Detroit Electric says:

        So this must be a new platform then. Would you consider this vehicle if it was brought to the U.S. to be sold?

        1. Mister G says:

          HELL NO…its a toy LOL

        2. WadeTyhon says:

          Me? Not a chance even at 5k.

          Not to say no one would. I know someone who has a smart car and loves it. So some people might be interested in this type of vehicle.

          But that is a tiny market in most of the US. Probably a bigger market in Europe and Asia.

          In the states, I could only see this being useful for places like college or corporate campuses – or in dense cities like New York.

        3. Hans Wurst says:

          I’d rather buy or used Fiat 500e or some such for that price.

          1. Mark.ca says:

            That is true! real value in these used 500e.

        4. Gasbag says:

          Not a chance. The actual price is 76,800 yuan starting. That translates to ~$11,500. Before they could import it they would have to upgrade it to US safety standards which is going to add several thousand. Airbags and a reinforced cage aren’t cheap. You’re also going to have to deal with shipping and stealership costs. By then you’re approaching 20K and we haven’t even gotten to the fact that the battery is 14.9kWh so it doesn’t qualify for the $7500 tax incentive.

          Oh and the 96 miles is NEDC so we’re actually talking about 60 some EPA miles.

          A two seater with 60 some miles of range can be a primary vehicle (based on miles driven) in a household with multiple drivers that can share it and where there are other longer range options available. If your household fits that bill then consider a used Smartfortwo. They go for 4-7K here. A Fiat 500e would be about the same price range and used Leafs and Spark EVs are in the 8-13K range.

          A lot of used Leafs could hit the market in April 2018 as Nissan has been extending leases to March to avoid having a glut prior to the availability of Leaf2.0.
          I don’t see how Leaf2.0 won’t devalue Leafs coming off lease.

          1. Tom says:

            NEVs don’t have crash test standards.

            1. Gasbag says:

              True but then you have to limit the top speed to 25-35 MPH depending on state and you don’t get the incentives. You can already get cheaper NEVs so I’m doubt anyone would shell out 12-15 k$ for this thing. It is a Smart for two knockoff that would be much less functional, less safe, at double the price of a used Smartfortwo. Good luck selling that.

  3. WadeTyhon says:

    For $5k after subsidies? Well that is certainly a better value than a Smart ED.

    I would never buy a car that small. But I could see it doing well in congested cities outside China. Wherever the Smart sells well.

  4. Someone out there says:

    What the heck is wrong with GM? Once again they make a car a lot of people wants but they refuse to sell it!

    1. Someone out there says:

      No wonder GM has to be bailed out. There is nothing wrong with their cars, it’s the management that sucks

    2. Nada says:

      Please tell me you are not talking about people in the US wanting this…
      As the general population has shown that 3,000 pound cars are too small for them to drive a person to work and back so they need 4,000 pound SUVs to do that…

      1. AlphaEdge says:

        LOL! Best comment of that day!

      2. Someone out there says:

        I’m talking about the 5000 Chinese who wants to buy it but only 500 can, according to the article.

        1. Taser54 says:

          So Tesla must be a mjor screw up with 450k wanting a model 3 and only 100 available this month? Smh. You made a terrible assumption that 500 cars were all that were being produced. Think a bit before you post. These are limited initial sales- for ONE province.

          1. Someone out there says:

            *I* made? Why don’t you read the article?

            1. Terawatt says:

              Hmmm.. did you..?

              > However, only another 500 will be available in Guangxi presently.

              The word “presently” is key.

              That said, you may well be right that GM doesn’t want to sell it. Just look at their behavior with the Bolt, which presumably is what you were alluding to.

              1. Taser54 says:

                Nope. He made an awful assumption from that sentence. Here is the key paragraph from the source (linked at end of the article)

                “On July 10, SAIC-GM-Wuling began limited pre-sales of the E100 in Liuzhou, Guangxi. More than 5,000 people registered for the first 200 vehicles. Another 500 vehicles will be available starting tomorrow, with sales initially limited to Guangxi.”

                He just wanted to bash GM. That’s fine, but it’s unsupported.

      3. john doe says:

        Check global sales of the Ford F series, that year after year is the most sold car in the US.

        In most other countries it is not in the top 50

        Heavy, thirsty, way to high CO2 emissions, so it gets taxed to hell.

        But I guess a small cheap (but still fairly safe) car could sell to people for city use (only).

  5. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

    As it is now, this will most likely NOT meet US DOT and crash tests.
    So sending it to the US is not an option.

    1. Steve P says:

      It looks like it already crashed. 🙂

    2. Texas FFE says:

      If the Smart EV can pass crash tests this thing can. It’s the engineering that makes a car pass crash tests, not size. Some of the biggest cars have some of the worst crash test performance and visa-versa.

      1. (⌐■_■) Trollnonymous says:

        Yeah, that’s why I put “As it is now…” because it’s most likely engineered for crash tests for their region.

        1. Tom says:

          NEVs do not need to meet crash test standards….the more you know.

      2. Asak says:

        Well, it also increases production costs to make a car so that it meets safety standards. A lot of Chinese vehicles wouldn’t be allowed on U.S. roads, and if GM is trying to compete with that segment then they might have sacrificed safety for cheaper production cost.

      3. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

        “If the Smart EV can pass crash tests this thing can.”

        Hmmm, no, that means something the size of the E100 can pass crash tests. That doesn’t mean that something designed for the Chinese market can pass American crash tests for highway-capable cars. Count on it: It won’t.

        1. SmallCars4Ever says:

          article states it is capable of highway speeds. Would think they would make sure passengers would survive a crash. The extra engineering and materials are probably not really the expensive part, its testing and proving it to regulators.

    3. Someone out there says:

      Yes I would guess they have cut a few corners here and there

  6. Stx says:

    Is it cardboard? 😉

  7. Taser54 says:

    Looks like GM is prepared for China’s EV mandate after all.

  8. scott franco says:

    OMG FUGLY

  9. John says:

    This again proves big 3 and big oil are owned by the same family in US. It would be good without subsidy. The subsidy was about 50000 yuan if I remember it right so without subsidy it costs about 12000 dollars which is too high and again this proves China using govnnmt subsidy to prop and direct market direction.

    1. Asak says:

      Subsidies are designed to encourage EV adoption? You don’t say.

  10. SparkEV says:

    They should just bring back SparkEV to China. With lower battery prices, they could probably sell them for about $20K pre-subsidy. With scale, they can probably swing closer to $16K pre-subsidy, same as gas version. Combined with generous Chinese subsidy, it could be well under $10K. A 4 seater with 140 HP at that price, they’d have waiting list years long.

  11. Bill Howland says:

    GM builds the car that China wants, and then hopes that CHINA will always be nice to them, and not kick them out after the Chinese partners have completely exhausted any proprietary technology.

  12. Peter says:

    These small cars for local use at a very low price will be a big market almost everywhere.
    They will not been driving in very high speeds but they could be built as safe as a SMART car, that is ok to go at high speeds.
    Yes they are only better golf carts, but still more comfort and better speed and range at almost the same price.
    Always charged at home and ready for some commuting.

    1. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

      “These small cars for local use at a very low price will be a big market almost everywhere.”

      Presumably you mean “almost everywhere outside the USA”. Americans don’t like microcars because they think they are too unsafe.

  13. Pushmi-Pullyu says:

    If it can be sold in the USA as a low-speed NEV (Neighborhood Electric Vehicle), with speed electronically limited to 25 MPH, for under $6000, then that will be an accomplishment. Safety standards for a NEV are much less than for a highway-rated car.

    Those of us who were Usual Suspects on the now-defunct TheEEStory forum will remember the Canadian-built ZENN, a two-seater NEV, from the ZENN Motor Company, produced from 2006-2010, powered by lead-acid batteries and with a claimed range of “up to” 40 miles. Various online sources report the base price as $12,000 or $15,995 or even $17,245. So I’m unsure of the actual price, but obviously a <$6000 price for the E100 (perhaps closer to $7000 after shipping from China plus U.S. dealer prep?) would be a great improvement, and so would its claimed range of 96 miles.

  14. Moché says:

    WOuld buy in a heartbeat.

  15. Steven says:

    Where’s the rest of it?

  16. mexican says:

    This thing would sell like crazy in Mexico

  17. Paul GOVAN says:

    …because they’re way too expensive outside of China !

    Amazing how comment-posters and trolls simply cannot face up to the obvious ugly truth that “Western” carmakers just don’t want to see EVs expand beyond niche here – limit the choice, limit the range, charge exorbitant prices.
    Just how many more documentaries has Chris Paine(“Who Killed…”) gotta make before the population wakes up to the fact that Western carmakers still can’t stomach the prospect of EVs
    breaking out beyond niche and cannibalizing their core combustion market segment.
    As for the old “safety standards” alibi – utter nonsense. If improvements or alterations are required it would cost the likes of GM a pittance per mass-produced car !
    Anyone else wanna use EVs to express xenophobic hatred or competitive contempt for China and the Chinese ?
    Remember: GM holds the record for the biggest vehicle recall in history(over 11 million) – over 200 people died as a result of the ignition fault.

    Paul G
    Editor EVUK

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