Formula E Expecting 6 To 8 Manufacturers For Season 2


Formula E CEO Alejandro Agag Answers Questions

Formula E CEO Alejandro Agag Answers Questions recently interviewed Alejandro Agag, co-founder of Formula E, on the cars that will be used in the second racing season.

Initially, the cars (all-electric single-seater Spark-Renault SRT_01E) are the same for all 10 teams. They were developed by Dallara, McLaren Electronics Systems, Williams Advanced Engineering, Spark Racing Technology and Renault with Michelin tires.

In the second season, teams will be able to develop their own cars, with different technology. By October 31, 12 applications were presented by manufacturers to FIA.

Agag expects that 6-8 will sign up after the stage of negotiations on the direction where Formula E should go.

“They are a mix of car manufacturers and others are technology companies – which is a really different option for us, so ones that produce batteries, electric motors or even a full powertrain – and we will find out who has been successful in the next week.

“We will then have meetings to clearly define their roadmap of the technology level of the championship.”

“It’s very important to develop a five-year roadmap to define the clear direction that this championship is going to go.”

“We need to decide what areas can be developed and what can not – but the focus must remain on the electric powertrain.”

“We will have the competition that we’ve always wanted to have that will improve the technology.”

The current Spark chassis could be kept for a number of years and then the teams would only develop battery packs and drivetrains, however until a final statement is released, anyything is possible.

Interesting is that among the manufacturers that applied to the series are big names (we don’t know who exactly), so maybe even Tesla will give racing a try. BMW already supports Formula E and we should expect to see the German automaker become one of the manufacturers, just like Renault is now.


Category: Racing

9 responses to "Formula E Expecting 6 To 8 Manufacturers For Season 2"
  1. Lou says:

    The concept of Formula E racing is intriguing. What surprised me about the initial races was that the cars did not have battery swapping as their manner of keeping the cars running. I guess the answer to “range anxiety” was to just have 2 cars for each entrant. Frankly, I think that you’d have a more impressive event showing cars swapping batteries in under a minute(a la Tesla’s recent demonstration). Would reinforce to the average person that EV’s are capable of reasonable driving range if the proper approach is taken. Maybe they will eventually go this route; I hope so, at least to dispell unnecessary fears about EV’s.


    1. Travis R says:

      I believe one thing that makes a Fomula E battery swap difficult at this point is that the battery pack and housing is actually a stressed part of the chassis.

      As Formula E continues to evolve, new manufacturers get involved, and the current spec chassis is phased out in favor of constructors building their own chassis, battery swaps will potentially be doable. This might be a few years yet.

      Additionally, there is interest amongst the Formula E partners (Qualcomm, in particular) of wireless charging. Perhaps we’ll soon see the cars doing a “pit stop” by simply driving through the pit lane over wireless chargers at a speed that can allow the charging to occur.

      1. James says:

        Wouldn’t it be amazing for participating tracks or racecourses to have inductive strips installed at certain locations along the course and the cars never having to pit just for energy? That would be a huge eye-opening to the general public and race fans alike!

        For F-E the sky is the limit. Innovation and invention are it’s middle name. Today’s iteration is fantastic and it’s surprising to me how fast it’s reaching acceptance among race fans. I can’t wait for future manufacturers to dive in, and compete – that competition being the mother of invention, and consumer cars with plugs will no doubt reap the rewards.

        1. Boomer says:

 this redtube or what: slowdown buddy, please!

      2. Mikael says:

        With a new chassi hopefully they could bring battery swapping into place instead of car swapping.
        It would be really exiting to have that pit stop speed change back in racing. Like it was in F1 when they were allowed to fill the gas tank extremely fast so that the deck change was the time defining act.

        But forget about wireless. Then they would need the whole circuit to be filled with coils and even then it would be really hard at that speed and considering the size of the coils you would be happy if they would get 20-30 kW coils with maybe 70-80% efficiency.

        The batteries today have 28 kWh of usable power. That would mean that they would need to charge for 1-2 hours to fill the battery that they now deplete in 20 minutes (while not driving all that fast anyway).
        And that is assuming that they drive over the coils in the track during 100% of the time which won’t happen unless they have a wide track of coils throughout the course.

        My bet is better batteries and (hopefully) battery swapping.

        1. Boomer says:

          Interesting- cheers big ears!

      3. Boomer says:

        I like that last paragraph… this is why I follow the story that is formula-e : how very exciting to be part of the saga!!

    2. Boomer says:

      I agree: but it’s all good!

  2. Boomer says:


    I say no: infact this has become the very measure that will improve in time and thus be the light not hidden under the bushel.

    Entropy: the fossil fuel rule is disintegrating.