Flat Tire Moment In A Nissan LEAF – Video


It’s a fact that most new cars do not come with spare tires. However, most car owners are unaware of this until they experience their first flat in their new ride.  If you’re lucky, the car comes with runflats (we won’t discuss the sacrifices in ride & handling that typically come along with these runflats).  If you’re less lucky, you have a full-size spare.  Further down the rung of luck is a compact spare.  Then, way down at the bottom is that can of fix-a-flat and some sort of air compressor.

The lack of a spare tire is especially common in electric cars where every attempt is made to keep weight to a minimum.

Here’s the story (and an informative video) of one Nissan LEAF owner who found out the hard way that her car does not have a spare tire:

This Compact Spare Fits

This Compact Spare Fits

I am pretty handy and resourceful but I have to admit my recent most embarrassing moments. Although I’ve had many flat tires in the past, I was surprised and shocked at how little I knew about my new Nissan Leaf. This problem may not be unique to Nissan Leaf (electric or not), because many newer cars have some solutions you are not familiar with, so spend some time to study this before you have a flat tire.

This is the story: our new Nissan Leaf (a newly leased car) got a flat tire in the middle of a parking lot. So, not the first time, just calmly figure out what to do, right? But then I noticed both left and right had earth moving equipment moving in. and realized that the parking lot was going through construction and renovation. Now I was under pressure just to move the car to somewhere else. Still, not a big deal, just a flat tire, right? Wrong again. Now I am sharing my mistakes with you so that you do not have to make the same ones. Certainly I wish someone told me this (before my flat tire accident).

I am grateful to the construction team, if you are watching and smiling, who did not bulldoze or even tow my car, and in fact were both patient and helpful.

Category: Nissan


16 responses to "Flat Tire Moment In A Nissan LEAF – Video"
  1. Ken says:

    This has been discussed religously on mynissanleaf forum since the first cars hit the streets in December 2010. The 2011-2012 cars came with a lug wrench. All that is needed is a jack from an Altima brand new only $30. Also a donut from an altima in the junkyard about $25. There are even ways to mount it under the car so you dont have to carry it in rhe trunk. This solution was figured out almost 5 years ago. Who would buy a car and not ask to see where the spare is located until they got a flat?

    1. BraveLilToaster says:

      Maybe it’s because I’m a big city boy now, in spite of growing up in a place where distances were measured in “hours” instead of “kilometers”, but it’s not like you’re ever really far from help. (or maybe that’s *because* I grew up in the wilds of Canada, that I have that kind of perspective?)

      You could in many situations easily call a cab, take your tire to the nearest Canadian Tire, get it fixed, and bring it back to your car. Probably within an hour. Likewise, it wouldn’t be overly difficult to borrow someone’s spare for a day, although as the article states, those are getting rarer by the day.

      1. sven says:

        Real men carry a tire plug kit, and plug their flat tires themselves. 😉

        1. Steven says:

          Until they get a bike with spoked wheels and tubes in the tires.

        2. Mister G says:

          After Hurricane Andrew hit south Florida I learned to plug my own tires and now carry a plug kit. I had to plug 3 flats in one day during the cleanup after Andrew hit.

  2. kubel says:

    1) The wheel must have a 5×4.5″ bolt pattern. There’s nothing Nissan or LEAF specific about this pattern, it’s used by millions of cars, including (and conveniently) my gas powered Ford.
    2) The wheel must have enough clearance for the brakes.
    3) The wheel must have enough clearance for the hub (though I doubt you will find a wheel with a hub bore smaller than 66.1mm).

    Summary: Go to the junk yard or search craigslist for a 2002-2010 Altima spare. Though unconfirmed, you should also be able to use a spare from any Ford Panther platform (Crown Victoria, Grand Marquis, Town Car).

  3. jdbob says:

    How can a replacement canister of sealant cost that much? Replacements for my C-Max are only about $25.

    1. bbock says:

      It’s the lunacy of the dealer business model. They charge exorbitant rates for something you should be able to buy from Amazon at a fraction of the cost. The Chevy Volt’s battery pack is priced at $34,000, which is about the price of the car. It’s non-sensical. But GM says not to worry because nobody buys a pack. Instead they get he damaged parts replaced. Yet that $34K part appears in their price list because of the Dealer business model. I wish they could do away with that outmoded model.

  4. Lad says:

    I carry towing on my State Farm insurance for 50 miles range in case the hole is too ig for the chemical patch job. The dealer and/or Nissan towing is the last place you go because their motto is “Don’t give a needy person an even break.” Also, I don’t know why a “slime kit,” $40 from Amazon, wouldn’t work. $150 for a Nissan flat kit, indeed.

  5. martinwinlow says:

    1/ Put some air in it and *drive* the car out of the way of the big machines – what were you thinking… that the tire was going to explode if you dared drive it 100 feet with only 10PSI in it????

    2/ Call the AA (AAA?) – or don’t they have phones where you live?

    3/ Why on *Earth* would you buy *anything* from a dealer when you can buy *Exactly* the same thing off eBay (and I mean *exactly* the same thing – make, can size etc) for half the price?!

    4/ You’ve bought a new car which is the first truly mass-produced vehicle that uses a completely different means of propulsion to that which has gone before. Do you a/ *thoroughly read the owner’s manual* before driving it any significant distance or b/ just jump in and drive around until, inevitably, something untoward occurs when you just sit there like a lemming and hope someone intelligent will come along and dig you out of your sorry hole?!

    ???????????????????????????????? MW

  6. John C says:

    When I leased my LEAF, I got an Altima compact space off Fleabay and a nice vinyl cover, tied it down flat to the EVSE anchor in the back with some webbing, and put a $20 jack in the fender hold.

    Cheap solution, <$100, (compared to having to replace a tire that I use the goop on, assuming it works). And cheap peace of mind.

    I had one slow flat near my home this winter, but since I had snows on, I just swapped on one all-season to drive the car and the bad snowtire to the shop.

  7. Stephen Hodges says:

    I slimed all four tyres and keep a full size spare at home (and a plug kit), but cannot find a spare rim that fits in Jamaica. Risky though, as punctures are a way of life here. I wish someone would sell all those useful things in one place.

  8. Clay says:

    So this is how the phrase “living under a rock” was born. duh….

    So take the time to actually R E A D the owner’s manual, buy the CORRECT sized spare tire and jack ( auto-recycle yard a.k.a. Junkyard) and a 4-way lug wrench and a plug kit at the auto parts store, the car already comes with an air compressor.

    I bought my spare and jack even before I picked up my Leaf. Something tells me someone was not listening when the “nice man” at the stealership told them they were screwed when they get a flat, oh, and the slime, use it and you just bought yourself a tire pressure sensor also.

    Martinwinlow was dead on about the lemmings. Laugh my a$$ off. Great logic, I see them all the time.

    1. And most important, a plug is only used to get you to a tire shop where the tire can be dismounted, inspected and repaired properly from the inside out if you did not have a spare. You know, that spare tire thing is looking better every moment.

  9. Lad says:

    This article is helpful to get us all thinking ahead…in that aspect, it’s good work.

    I find it interesting that Nissan’s logic of “no spare needed” has created a good market for used spare tires and aftermarket “Slime kits.”

  10. Jonathan says:

    If you lease. Buy the cheap sealant now (before you get a flat) replace your Nissan official one with it and that way if you get a flat, you can use the cheap gunk and still have the expensive Nissan one to give back with the lease return.